How to Build a Sustainable Ecosystem: The Relevance of Governance and Coopetition

How to Build a Sustainable Ecosystem: The Relevance of Governance and Coopetition

How to Build a Sustainable Ecosystem: The Relevance of Governance and Coopetition

Monday 14, 2019

How to Build a Sustainable Ecosystem: The Relevance of Governance and Coopetition

Monday 14, 2019

Entrerpreneurial Ecosystems

Sustainable entrepreneurial ecosystem is one of the latest trends for researchers and practitioners (see TBSearch, 2019). Every institution and every city wish to become a successful entrepreneurial ecosystem. A fantastic place where second chances are welcomed, where innovation is a personal and collective goal, where the entrepreneurial spirit is cultivating in educational institutions, where risk taking and proactiveness are key characteristics. But how can it be possible?

Entrepreneurial ecosystems are sets of interdependent species connected through various interactions within a specific geographic area to foster entrepreneurship and new business creation.

What about successful ecosystems?

Silicon Valley, Tel Aviv, Boston’s Route 128, North Carolina’s Research Triangle, Waterloo, Boulder, Sophia Antipolis are some of the famous entrepreneurial ecosystems that succeeded to create this entrepreneurial mindset. Most research discussions focus on these successful ecosystems by describing their configuration to inspire other cities to do the same. Other discussions take for granted that these successful ecosystems just happened, without investigating the nature and birth of these ecosystems. Furthermore, these latest debates fail to explain why these ecosystems succeeded better than others and how successful entrepreneurial ecosystems could be created in other places while considering local specificities. (Read more…).

Download the full article.

SMEs and Entrepreneurship – Leading the Way Forward

SMEs and Entrepreneurship – Leading the Way Forward

SMEs and Entrepreneurship – Leading the Way Forward

October 12, 2019

SMEs and Entrepreneurship – Leading the Way Forward

October 12, 2019

Macao, December 11 – 14, 2019

China is bold, ambitious, and have the resources. The “Greater Bay Area” (GBA) is a Chinese government’s initiative to link the cities of Hong Kong, Macau, Guangzhou, Shenzhen, Zhuhai, Foshan, Zhongshan, Dongguan, Huizhou, Jiangmen and Zhaoqing into an integrated economic and business hub.

We need Big Ideas to change the world and at the forefront on this transformation are small and medium enterprises (SMEs) who are ready to engage all sectors of the society (industry, academia, entertainment, etc.) to enable the GBA to take its place as a major economic hub.   

The SME World Forum focuses on Macau and with the theme of 2019, SMEs and Entrepreneurship – Leading the Way Forward. It is the premier event that brings all of these components together.

Submit an Executive Abstract (click here)

Send a Business Delegation (click here)

Learn About Macao (click here) – No Visa required for 66+ countries.

The Historic Center of Macau, inscribed as a World Heritage Site in 2005, is filled with cultural treasures:

  • A-Ma Temple: It is the oldest temple in Macau, and is an exemplary representation of Chinese culture inspired by Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, and multiple folk beliefs.
  • Ruins of St. Paul’s Cathedral: They are the ruins of a 16th-century complex and regarded as one of Macau’s best-known landmarks.
  • Senado SquareIt is the urban center of Macau. You may feel you are in a city by the Mediterranean Sea when you see the pastel-colored neo-classical buildings around the square.
  • Monte FortIt is an almost 400-year-old stone fort, which offers superb sunset and casino views from the top.

www.SMEWorldForum.org

Small Matters: Global evidence on the contribution to employment by the self-employed, micro-enterprises and SME’s

Small Matters: Global evidence on the contribution to employment by the self-employed, micro-enterprises and SME’s

Small Matters: Global evidence on the contribution to employment by the self-employed, micro-enterprises and SME’s

Thursday 10, 2019

Small Matters: Global evidence on the contribution to employment by the self-employed, micro-enterprises and SME’s

Thursday 10, 2019

ICSB is extremely proud to announce a ground-breaking ILO study that reveals that seven in 10 workers are self-employed or in small businesses, a finding that has significant implications for employment and enterprise support policies worldwide. 

Drawing on a new ILO database, this report provides an up-to-date and realistic assessment of the global contribution of self-employment and micro- and small enterprises to employment – both in the formal and the informal economy.

How relevant are micro-enterprises and SMEs for the future of work? What about the self-employed?

Until recently, there was relatively limited empirical evidence available to answer these questions. Many earlier studies did not cover the informal economy, which in many countries is the largest contributor to employment. There has also been growing recognition of the role of self-employment and micro-enterprises in driving employment.

Thanks to a new ILO database using data from the household, labour and other statistical surveys conducted in 99 countries between 2009 and 2018, we now have a much better picture. The contribution of small economic units to worldwide total employment is striking, but there remain considerable challenges such as widespread informal employment (especially in developing countries), gender gaps, and issues related to the productivity and job quality in smaller firms. A proper understanding of the contribution of small economic units is key to advancing the ILO Decent Work Agenda and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Read the report.

ICSB congratulates the ILO.

Best Wishes,

Dr. Ayman El Tarabishy
ICSB Executive Director of ICSB

What Paris Taught the World!

What Paris Taught the World!

What Paris Taught the World!

Wednesday 9, 2019

What Paris Taught the World!

Wednesday 9, 2019

L’Exposition Universelle de’ Entrepreneurship

The Paris Exposition of 1900 — Paris Exposition Universelle — introduced marvels that would shape the future as they ushered in the dawn of the twentieth century. The world’s fair was visited by an astounding fifty million visitors and featured flying machines, plus other inventions and architecture that would mark the new century, among them the Grande Roue ferris wheel, diesel engines, talking films, escalators, and the first magnetic audio recorder, called the telegraphone.

The 1900 Paris Exposition had the largest participation of any exposition with more than 83,000 exhibitors. But most importantly, it secured Paris’ reputation as a leading city of the modern age. Paris showed the world that it was in the forefront of technological innovation with the Metro, Gare de Lyon, and the Pont d’Alexandre III. Here are some highlights.

Innovation and entrepreneurship are needed in society as much as in the economy, in public services as much as business. What we need is an entrepreneurial society in which innovation and entrepreneurship are normal, steady, and continuous. It will require the entrepreneurs/leaders in all institutions to make them ongoing, everyday activities.

Modern society is a hyper-connected society. The integration and convergence of many specialized fields has been evident throughout history. The impact of these convergences on the world is enormous. Converged creativity is especially noteworthy. If Edison is the model for the original notion of creativity, Steve Jobs is the one for converged creativity. Convergence is the hallmark of the “mega synergy” era. The simple formula of the past, 1 + 1 = 2 + α, is passing away. In fact, the +α concept, which has been emphasized in economics and business management literature for decades, is now a limitation. However, the mega synergy created by the convergence of different products from different sectors in the modern era overcomes this limitation.

It is natural that business models should change with time. The one-product-market model was applicable during the eras of agrarian and early industrial societies, when the value chain systems were quite simple. However, with the ever- more-sophisticated information technologies of these days, the one-product-market model is rapidly disappearing because of the competitive nature of today’s business world and the creativity and constant innovation occurring in many companies.

Technological innovations should be embraced as part of the solution for MSMEs to increase productivity and focus on job creation. Developed countries are also exploring the possibility that we may need to revisit the concept of the digital universal basic income as human jobs are replaced by machines. It was noted that while we may treat human capital as other capital, human capital should not depreciate over time. We need to support an evolved educational system with the private sector driving training.

The human aspect of small businesses cannot be underestimated, and we need to develop guiding principles about human behavior. The concept of Humane Entrepreneurship presents a new way of how employee and employer can work together more efficiently and sustainably.

Happiness in the end is more important than the simple fulfillment of physical needs. People are more willing to participate in entrepreneurship in their local communities and contribute to a sustainable world.

ICSB is heading to Paris, France for the 65th World Congress.

Time to bring together the world. Time to change the world for the better like the The Paris Exposition of 1900 — Paris Exposition Universelle.

This time it is the L’Exposition Universelle de’ Entrepreneurship.

Sincerely,

Dr. Ayman El Tarabishy
Executive Director of the International Council for Small Business (ICSB)

The “I” in Paris

The “I” in Paris

The “I” in Paris

Wednesday 9, 2019

The “I” in Paris

Wednesday 9, 2019

An International Conference to Examine the “I” in Global

What does the letter “I” in Paris represent? Perhaps it is the individual small business owner, trying to eke out a living. The incubation of innovation by institutions triples the “I” as universities and foundations that support university research establish formal operations designed to help individuals who are potential entrepreneurs actually initiate entrepreneurial ventures. Or it might be investment innovations designed to increase profits for financial institutions.

An underlying metaphor for all of the above is known as “the butterfly effect.” In its best-known form, the butterfly effect shows how the flap of a butterfly’s wings in Brazil has a tiny (but crucial) effect on the wind in the immediate vicinity. This, in turn, has a stronger effect on wind patterns and, ultimately, on weather. The final effect, carried out after a long series of increasingly strong impacts, is to create a tornado in Texas. Consider how each of the following actual and potential butterfly effects, represent one or another interpretation of the “I” in global.

The Individual. In Tunisia one poor fruit and vegetable vendor, seeking only to provide food and shelter for his family, immolated himself when authorities refused to stop harassing him. Today a leader sits in Damascus, 2400 km away, worried that nothing he can do will stop unarmed demonstrators who are demanding an end to his family’s forty-year rule and keep the masses from bringing down his regime. The “Arab Spring” that began with the action of one individual has already toppled three dictators and may have been the impetus that led King Saud to decree suffrage for Saudi women. And the butterfly is still stirring the air currents.

Incubation of Innovation by Institutions. Universities and research organizations have traditionally focused on developing basic scientific knowledge. Today, however, there is a growing emphasis on applications of knowledge, that is, innovation. And not only has the focus on innovation increased, it has shifted from simply generating patents to providing a setting in which innovative ideas are “incubated,” that is, provided with development resources that may result in practical and marketable innovative products and processes. Institutional policies and commitment to incubation of entrepreneurial innovation are, however, far from widespread, despite the potential for producing economic growth. What institutions will engage, like the Defense A Research P A, to produce the next internet butterfly effect?

Innovations in Investments. Beginning in the 1990s, banks and financial institutions In the U.S., Europe, Asia, and elsewhere created innovative new products and established entrepreneurial ventures to market them. In the U.S. loans were made to individuals who wanted better homes and better lives. A great number of these loans were, however, almost certain to fail because the borrowers did not have the resources needed to maintain payments, especially when the housing market collapsed and the economy nearly collapsed along with it. Even worse, these loans were packaged as “securities” and sold to investors as “collateralized debt obligations” or CDOs. A small initial (and generally desirable) cause, the desire of individuals to own homes, has already produced massive (and negative) outcomes, namely loss of those homes and institutional failures. Will the U.S. government or one of its agencies discover and carry out some small action that might reverse these changes?

Innovation and Entrepreneurship. The last two examples illustrate an important question, that is, what role should national and international policy play with regard to innovation and entrepreneurship. There are, of course, various more specific questions, such as, “What is the role of national and international policy in driving and supporting the sort of innovation and entrepreneurship needed to spur economic growth and development?” That is a question of particular relevance given the global economic crisis of 2008 and the continued potential for future economic crises.

Small changes can produce massive, even global, outcomes. That is the point of the first example, an illustration of the butterfly effect. The “I” in global reminds us of the importance of innovation, which the economic theorist Joseph Schumpeter argued is the driver of economic growth and development by means of a process he called “creative destruction.” But it may also remind us that individuals, entrepreneurs, are the actors that are crucial for such innovation and change. We should realize that globalization (there’s that missing “I” again!) is ultimately linked to the individual, just as the movement of a butterfly’s wings may be linked to dramatic changes in the weather a continent away.

The world is constantly creatively destructing and reconstructing itself; individual innovation and entrepreneurship are playing critical roles. Institutions—such as the ICSB 65th World Congress in Paris—can help initiate positive trends for the future. (ICSB 2020 Paris). 

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