Remembering the “Father of ‘disruptive innovation'” Dr. Clayton Christensen

Remembering the “Father of ‘disruptive innovation'” Dr. Clayton Christensen

Remembering the “Father of ‘disruptive innovation'” Dr. Clayton Christensen

Monday, January, 27, 2020

Remembering the “Father of ‘disruptive innovation'” Dr. Clayton Christensen

Monday, January, 27, 2020

ICSB takes a moment to remember Dr. Clayton Christensen

 

How He Changed How We Look at Entrepreneurship

Dr. Clayton Christensen was a Harvard Business School professor who coined the term “disruptive innovation”. He passed away on January 23rd due to complications from leukemia. We remember him for his contributions in business and entrepreneurship, in which he taught us how to think about innovation differently.

A paradoxical answer he found when asked “Why do companies fail? Or rather: How is it that a small start-up can take on an industry giant and win?” was that many companies succeeded not by making something better, but by building something worse, manufacturing shoddy and inexpensive products that catered to the low end of the market. The Harvard Business review expands on this by saying:

“Disruption” describes a process whereby a smaller company with fewer resources can successfully challenge established incumbent businesses. Specifically, as incumbents focus on improving their products and services for their most demanding (and usually most profitable) customers, they exceed the needs of some segments and ignore the needs of others. Entrants that prove disruptive begin by successfully targeting those overlooked segments, gaining a foothold by delivering more-suitable functionality—frequently at a lower price. Incumbents, chasing higher profitability in more-demanding segments, tend not to respond vigorously. Entrants then move upmarket, delivering the performance that incumbents’ mainstream customers require while preserving the advantages that drove their early success. When mainstream customers start adopting the entrants’ offerings in volume, disruption has occurred.

Dr. Christensen made these findings mainstream in his book “The Innovator’s Dilemma” (1997) which propelled him to relative stardom after Intel executive Andy Grove called it the most important book he’d read in a decade. He also appeared on a 1999 cover of Forbes, and The Economist magazine later named “The Innovator’s Dilemma” one of the six greatest business books ever written. “Everybody talks about disruption now,” investor and tech writer George Gilder told the New Yorker in 2012. “Clayton inserted that word in the mind of every CEO in technology. Everywhere you go, people explain that they’re disrupting this or disrupting that.”

Dr. Clayton Christensen will be forever immortalized by his term “disruptive innovation” as it has inspired countless entrepreneurs and business leaders to think differently about their operations. His countless lessons and advice will be furthered realized as we see entrepreneurs innovate even more so than they have in the past. This is just one of the ways Dr. Christensen’s memory will live on among us.

The Role of Micro-Small and Medium Enterprises in Achieving the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals

The Role of Micro-Small and Medium Enterprises in Achieving the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals

The Role of Micro-Small and Medium Enterprises in Achieving the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals

Monday, January, 27, 2020

The Role of Micro-Small and Medium Enterprises in Achieving the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals

January, Monday, 27, 2020

Can Micro-Small and Medium Enterprises Be Part of the Solution to Reach the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals?

There is less empirical evidence on MSMEs growth in developing and emerging economies than in the developed world. MSMEs in developing and developed countries are faced with different challenges. Many MSMEs in developing countries are still informally organized enterprises limiting their longevity and wider contributions they make towards the SDGs. There are also questions on how formalization of the economy ought to take place.
 
Moreover, demands and challenges vary within the micro, small and medium enterprises cluster itself demands and challenges faced by micro enterprises are different from those faced by small and medium enterprises. Studies show that the growth of MSMEs in developing and least developed countries (LDCs) dominate in sectors which are labor intensive and possess low barriers to entry, including agriculture and agribusiness, manufacturing and service sector.
 
Women, youth and other vulnerable groups face more difficult challenges in MSME development. Women and youth MSME entrepreneurs, for example, particularly those from rural poor communities, are often further disadvantaged in growing their business, lacking land deeds and/or collateral needed to access formal sources of credit.
 
Other challenges include limited access to finance and lack of capacity and knowledge, particularly with regards to business development, marketing and strategic management skills (Read more…).
Global SME Finance Forum 2020

Global SME Finance Forum 2020

Global SME Finance Forum 2020

Monday, December 20, 2020

Global SME Finance Forum 2020

Monday, December 20, 2020

SME Finance Outlook 2030

The SME Finance Forum, Managed by the IFC, are thrilled to announce that the Global SME Finance Forum 2020 will be held on 26-28 October in Bangkok
 
Since its formation, the SME Finance Forum has been on top of all of the major trends in the SME Finance field. To celebrate the new decade, this year’s global event will look much farther forward, to imagine where we might be in SME financing a decade from now. 
 
Call for Insights
Following our practice of leveraging as much knowledge sharing as we can from our membership and our wider public audience, we will launch a public “Call for Insights” on what SME finance will look like in 2030. 
 
Submission guidelines will be shared soon.
The Need For Nurturing Entrepreneurship

The Need For Nurturing Entrepreneurship

The Need For Nurturing Entrepreneurship

Monday, January, 20, 2020

The Need For Nurturing Entrepreneurship

January, Monday, 20, 2020

Should there be a focus on Promoting and Developing Digital Entrepreneurs Nationally and Internationally?

Europe and mainly Italy is the land of family businesses mostly categorized as small to medium enterprises. They are recognized to be the backbone of the current economy, enhancing international and local growth. Those companies have been surviving transferring their know-how from generation to the next generation. They have been increasing the employability rate and improving the wealth state of their own country.
 
But nowadays everywhere people, social media, and others voice out that those family businesses are looking outside their local territory, going to develop their business because it is cheap and more convenient. The employment rate is getting lower and the overall sentiment about the future economy is not so great. Young people are moving abroad to spot their lucky chance. Yet, the need for entrepreneurship is urgently emerging. Universities are designing programs to connect young people with opportunities to progress and empower them on their journey towards employment.
 
It gives students in higher education the chance to create their own company while still pursuing their studies (Read more…).
Message from ICSB President – Vote for NEW ICSB BYLAWS

Message from ICSB President – Vote for NEW ICSB BYLAWS

Message from President of ICSB 2019-2020 – Vote for NEW ICSB BYLAWS

Monday December 17, 2019

A New Beginning: ICSB 2.0

Dear ICSB Family,

On December 11th, 2019, ICSB held the second board meeting in Macao under my Presidency. The objective of this meeting was to closely follow up on work plans and review the work appointed to the committees that have been executing. The ICSB Board has approved a new set of bylaws for ICSB, which reflects a new business model covering our four pillars of membership; academia, researchers, policymakers, as well as small business owners and entrepreneurs. After this historic board meeting, I am extremely delighted to report to you the following:

  1. The new bylaws are built on a framework of the need for a new and sustainable business model. This is due to the success we have achieved in 2017 with our work in partnership with the United Nations-led by Past President Dr. Ki-Chan Kim and our dynamic Executive Director Dr. Ayman El Tarabishy and many countries and partners in the declaration of the UN MSME Day celebrated on June 27th of every year.
  2. This new business model will allow for sustainable growth for ICSB in terms of footprint and financial growth through a newly developed product called ICSB Knowledge Hubs.
  3. Since 2015, it has been clear to the successive boards that the affiliate model required to be readdressed, modified, improved, or abolished. Upon the work from the 2020 and 2030 visioning committees, I charged a Bylaws committee led by President-Elect Winslow Sargent to work on new bylaws to match the new business model which addressed these concerns and established a new framework for partnerships with local groups rather than the chapter/ affiliate model which looks at local or regional groups as “partners of ICSB” rather than “subordinates” of ICSB. This was a clear recommendation also received from Ms. Vicki Stylianou, ICSB SVP Development.
  4. ICSB’s Board received a letter of dis-affiliation from ECSB, which ICSB board has approved effective December 11th, 2019. We hope we can re-engage with ECSB in the future as a Partner and wish them well for the future.
  5. The new bylaws and business model put the small business owner and entrepreneur at the heart of what we do: whether it is education, research, or policy advocacy- without the small business owners, there would be no supporting ecosystem.
  6. The new business model gives special attention to certain groups: women and youth have a major role to play in the future of ICSB.

A Final Personal Note from an ICSB President and a Volunteer to this Organization:

I am writing to you at a time of change for our organization.  Any change can cause tension, uncertainty, and sometimes unnecessary noise. This tension has been rooted in our recent history and I assure you that it goes years beyond any current bylaws or business model debate.

I have come here to seek a new beginning for ICSB; one based upon mutual interest and mutual respect and shared common principles – principles of justice and progress; tolerance and dignity of all human beings.

I will quote from President Barack H. Obama the following:

“I do so recognizing that change cannot happen overnight. No single person can eradicate years of mistrust, nor can I answer in the time that I have all the complex questions that brought us to this point. But I am convinced that to move forward, we must say openly the things we hold in our hearts, and that too often are said only behind closed doors. There must be a sustained effort to listen to each other; to learn from each other; to respect one another, and to seek common ground. As the Holy Quran tells us, “Be conscious of God and always speak the truth.” That is what I will try to do – to speak the truth as best I can, humbled by the task before us, and firm in my belief that the interests we share as human beings are far more powerful than the forces that drive us apart.

We are shaped by every culture, drawn from every end of the Earth, and dedicated to a simple concept: E Pluribus Unum: “Out of many, one.” – Barack H. Obama- Cairo, June 2009

Dear Members,

I am counting on your support of the proposed new bylaws.

STEP 1: REVIEW NEW ICSB BYLAWS (click here)

STEP 2: VOTE FOR ICSB NEW BYLAWS (click here)

I look forward to a great future for our global family of ICSB, where we will showcase our convening power of bringing together Asia, MENA, North America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania. We will also always celebrate and recognize the history this organization has since it was established in 1955.

We are all working for one common goal, supporting MSMEs worldwide while leaving no one behind.

Sincerely,

Ahmed Mohammed Osman

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