Small Business: Big Vision

Small Business: Big Vision

Small Business: Big Vision

Monday, December 9, 2019

Small Business: Big Vision

Monday, December 9, 2019

In early September, the Institute of Public Accountants and Deakin University held a major conference focusing on Australia’s flagging productivity.

Aside from addressing the current dire economic predicament, the Small Business: Big Vision event, run by the IPA Deakin SME Research Centre on 4 and 5 September 2019, pushed for a more concerted effort to boost SME productivity. The event brought together Australian and international experts to explore the creation of a sustainable ecosystem for SMEs, based on the five integral pillars financial capital, innovation, regulation, trade and internationalisation, and human capital.

While some say that small business is the engine room of the economy, we believe that is an understatement; we believe that small business is the whole factory, plant and equipment. Unless we stoke the fire beneath it, our future generations will suffer the consequences, the IPA CEO, Andrew Conway, said in announcing the event.

The full auditorium of policy makers, business people and accountants also heard from Eugene Cornelius Jr., senior adviser to the US Office of International Trade at the Small Business Administration; Dr.Winslow Sargeant, former chief counsel for advocacy appointed by and reporting direct to President Barack Obama; and Charles Matthews, Fulbright Scholar from the University of Cincinnati. (Read more…).

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How Entrepreneurship and Innovation is integral to Egypt’s TVET Reform

How Entrepreneurship and Innovation is integral to Egypt’s TVET Reform

How Entrepreneurship and Innovation is integral to Egypt’s TVET Reform

Monday, December 9, 2019

How Entrepreneurship and Innovation is integral to Egypt’s TVET Reform

Monday, December 9, 2019

Investing in an Inclusive Future

Education is at the core of the upliftment of standards and quality of life since it is the foundation for human capital. The application of appropriate science and technology is the basis for improved economic growth. As an alternative to traditional academic learning in Egypt, technical and vocational education and training is a substitute for the Egyptian high school degree Thanweya ‘Ama, where students enroll after the completion of their preparatory education and focus on occupational learning. With the globalization wave, requirement to develop knowledge and practical skills on a continuous basis is necessary. Many education development initiatives have taken on board the need to foster transferable skills, because characteristics such as innovation and creativity are increasingly needed for all levels and types of work. TVET has a special role to play in providing the knowledge and practical skills that empower people to improve the quality of their daily lives and earn income. TVET today involves more than skills acquisition programmes. Its policies and strategies stress the need for stronger links with the labour market and for strategies to help graduates to adjust continuously to the fast changes in the market.

Yet for a long time, TVET in the Region has been neglected, fragmented and unevenly developed. In recent years, with Egypt’s recognition of prior learning and skills acquired informally, there has been a policy shift that recognizes the importance of TVET in addressing a number of socioeconomic challenges faced by the government. Accommodating close to 2 million students and over half a million graduates per year, the sector in Egypt faces many challenges, especially in relation to the efficiency of the labour market and the deteriorating conditions that have disproportionally affected many of Egypt’s youth. The important role of education in promoting more entrepreneurial attitudes and behaviours is now becoming recognized and the benefits of entrepreneurship education are no longer just limited to start-ups, innovative ventures and new jobs.

In the past decade, most TVET reform programmes have been designed to prepare people for paid employment and many focus on employment in large enterprises to help TVET planners and providers improve the relevance of supply, by ensuring that the demand side is considered. Still there have been limitations in gearing Egyptian TVET youths to become active contributors due to pre-defined ideas of what they can and cannot do, depriving local communities of their talents, and therefore constraining meaningful pathways for individuals and economic growth. Entrepreneurship has also become a key competency for all, helping young people to be more creative and self-confident in whatever they undertake. TVET, at all levels including tertiary education, is a main contributor to entrepreneurship skills acquisition in both its senses because of its relevance in ensuring that the current and future labour meet economic development needs. Nonetheless, there is still relatively little emphasis in national development policies, and even fewer highlight the skills dimension of this component on the national economy. (Read more…)

Download the full ICSB Gazette.

The Future of Entrepreneurship Education is in… Carolina?

The Future of Entrepreneurship Education is in… Carolina?

The Future Of Entrepreneurship Education Is In … Carolina?

Saturday, December 7, 2019

The Future Of Entrepreneurship Education Is In … Carolina?

Saturday, December 7, 2019

The UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School Leads the Way in Entrepreneurship

Ted Zoller, Director of The Entrepreneurship Center at UNC’s Kenan-Flagler Business School, was recently featured on Poets&Quants, a leading online publication covering graduate business education, to comment on the school’s leadership in entrepreneurship. Here’s a snippet of what he had to share: 

“When you look at the community here in the research park, UNC is the dominant player,” Zoller says on a phone call with Poets&Quants. “Almost all of the big-scale companies that have exited were founded by UNC entrepreneurs. I’m not disparaging my friends at Duke or NC State, but we clearly are the leader.”

“What makes a great entrepreneurship ecosystem is building up the social capital and the leadership that can extract these innovations and turn them into businesses,” Zoller says. “Right now in Research Triangle, that culture is completely embedded. It’s just in the water. We’re just like Austin.” (Read more on Poets&Quants).

Introducing “The Entrepreneur’s Guide to Risk and Decisions” by Thom Pittz and Eric Liguori

Introducing “The Entrepreneur’s Guide to Risk and Decisions” by Thom Pittz and Eric Liguori

Introducing “The Entrepreneur’s Guide to Risk and Decisions” by USASBE’s own Thom Pittz and Eric Liguori

Wednesday, December 4, 2019

Introducing “The Entrepreneur’s Guide to Risk and Decisions” by USASBE’s own Thom Pittz and Eric Liguori

Wednesday, December 4, 2019

The University of Tampa and Rowan University are proud to highlight the work of professors Thomas Pittz and Eric Liguori in their new book, The Entrepreneur’s Guide to Risk and Decisions: Building Successful Early-Stage Ventures.

Available in January, The Entrepreneur’s Guide to Risk and Decisions is intended to serve as a powerful guide for entrepreneurs, investors, accelerators, incubators, and center directors and as a valuable compendium for educators in the classroom. It is published by Emerald Group Publishing and is available for pre-order online now with copies available at the USASBE conference in New Orleans, January 3-7, 2020.
 
Here’s what folks are saying about the book:
 
“The best advice I can give you is to take the content in this book seriously, work hard, surround yourself with the right people, and always try to remain positive and to persevere! Entrepreneurship is a marathon, not a sprint, so use this book to play the long game the smart way.”
–Kevin Harrington, original shark on the hit TV show “Shark Tank”
 
“There are few resources that effectively help entrepreneur’s navigate the black box of risk and decision-making along their tumultuous journey. Every aspect of that journey – whether it be marketing, financing, partner- ships, HR, networking, or actually launching has unlimited landmines that can put an end to a dream. This book is a critical how-to guide for any entrepreneur at any stage to spot and disarm those landmines with expert precision.”
—Doan Winkel, Senior Vice President of Programming, United States Association for Small Business and Entrepreneurship
 
“In their new book, The Entrepreneur’s Guide… Thom Pittz and Eric Liguori have identified all of the key issues that entrepreneurs face in developing and growing businesses and provide critical and detailed guidance for success. I am pleased to see a major section of the book devoted to networks and networking as an entrepreneur’s network of support is the foundation for entrepreneurial innovation and growth.”
—William B. Gartner, The Bertarelli Foundation Distinguished Professor Family Entrepreneurship, Babson College
 
“This book is an essential tool for every entrepreneur during his startup journey. It provides a handy reference which can be reverted to based on real life experiences. An essential companion for all aspiring entrepreneurs or small business owners.”
—Ahmed Osman, President, International Council for Small Business
 
“Thom Pittz and Eric Liguori have provided a no-nonsense, incredibly insightful and practical guide for entrepreneurs looking to launch and/or grown their businesses. Great insights on guerrilla marketing, the power and pitfalls of crowd funding, and understanding failure and rejection. Recognizing the massive amount of work and stress necessary to build a successful venture, Pittz and Liguori have masterfully distilled wisdom gained from working with hundreds of startups around the globe to help entrepreneurs avoid landmines and gear up for success. Great reading for anyone immersed in the entrepreneurial process!”
—Tim Mescon, Executive VP and Chief Officer, Europe, Middle East and Africa, AACSB International 
 

Click here to pre-order your copy today!

How to Educate Tomorrow’s Entrepreneurs

How to Educate Tomorrow’s Entrepreneurs

How to Educate Tomorrow’s Entrepreneurs

Monday, December 2, 2019

How to Educate Tomorrow’s Entrepreneurs

Monday, December 2, 2019

The Role of University Entrepreneurship Ecosystems

The notion that starting one’s own business is a substitute for college, or at least that college isn’t consistent with the idea of entrepreneurship, has not been true since our grandparents or great-grandparents’ generation. Yet we hear more about how Steve Jobs, Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg dropped out of college than we hear that other very successful entrepreneurs like Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, Jack Ma and Ariana Huffington actually graduated from one. Just google “successful entrepreneurs who went to college”; you’ll instead get a number of links to entrepreneurs who never finished or never went to one in the first place.

While the legend of the billionaire college dropout entrepreneur makes for a good news story, this is far from the norm. Figure 1 shows percentages, among the adult population and among entrepreneurs, who have completed a post-secondary level of education in 23 countries. As this figure demonstrates, the majority of countries have a much higher proportion of entrepreneurs with a college degree compared to the general population. In fact, more than half exhibit twice the percentage of college educated entrepreneurs as does the general populace. With our entrepreneurial hats on, we can surely say this represents an opportunity. If so many entrepreneurs have gone to college, can we increase their preparation for this endeavor during their studies? In so doing, we can enhance their skills and confidence in ultimately building impactful, long-lasting businesses. (Read more…)

Download the full ICSB Gazette 

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