Student housing solutions in an era of COVID-19

Student housing solutions in an era of COVID-19

Student housing solutions in an era of COVID-19

Monday, August, 3, 2020 by Wagdy Sawahel 

Student housing solutions in an era of COVID-19

Monday, August, 3, 2020 by Wagdy Sawahel 

Around the continent, university students face a shortfall of student accommodation, a situation exacerbated by the current COVID-19 pandemic containment measures which call for fewer students in living spaces.

At universities in Kenya and South Africa, students face a shortfall of over 600,000 and 300,000 beds at universities respectively.

“With the WHO voicing alarm at the spread of the coronavirus in Africa, African students living in dormitory-style accommodation will have to adhere to strict hygiene and social distancing measures, as under such conditions, a single COVID-19 infection could yield an uncontrolled outbreak within very short time,” Morad Ahmed Morad, professor of medicine at Egypt’s Tanta University, told University World News.

He said students should undergo COVID-19 testing and participate in online awareness programmes before moving in to university residences.

He suggested that isolation wards be established within student residences. These should be equipped with IT capabilities to allow students with exceptional circumstances or health concerns to participate in classes remotely. WHO guidance for accommodation and hotel providers must be strictly implemented, Morad added.

Design

According to architect and urban designer Sean Kenealy, who is also director at STAG African, a student accommodation group in South Africa, the current situation called for a “reconsideration” of the design of student accommodation.
“Hundreds of students across the continent are in traditional dormitory type accommodation, sharing communal facilities … putting them at risk of viral infection,” Kenealy told University World News.

“We need to implement ways of limiting social interaction, without losing the vitally important aspect of community. We have re-examined and tested the appropriateness of our pod-design solution. With eight students per pod and two per bedroom, we are better able to mitigate a pandemic such as the current one.

“This design limits personal interactions to just eight people, as opposed to older, institutional-type student housing designs, some of which have hundreds of students per floor. It allows for the effective implementation of health and safety deliverables,” Kenealy said.
Kenealy cited the example of a recent COVID-19 infection at one of the STAG residences. The other seven occupants of the pod tested negative, which meant that the infected student was quarantined in the pod and only seven of the 210 students in the residence had to be isolated.

“Our pod design provides communal living which closely replicates the home environment. This is an important element of familiarity in an otherwise daunting and often impersonal campus environment, particularly for first-year students. In this way, we provide a more conducive learning environment and more intimate social relationships, all of which assist with the enforcement of sanitisation measures, mask wearing and other healthcare imperatives,” Kenealy said.

Affordability

“Addressing affordability is the first step to solving the backlog of hundreds of thousands of beds across the continent. … A fundamental change in the procurement and delivery of student accommodation is required,” Kenealy said.

He suggested that on-site building activities and therefore the cost of student bed space could be significantly reduced by utilising a cellular concrete walling system and adopting a Design for Manufacture and Assembly (DfMA) approach to building.

“A Student Early Alert System for COVID-19 (SEAS) could be set up for instructors to connect students to on-campus resources and support services. …SEAS could support students with practical help through the use of mobile applications, internet, social media, radio or TV,” Ayah Mohamed Abdel-Fatah, a female student at the Higher Institute of Engineering and Technology in Mansoura, Egypt, told University World News.

Ayman El Tarabishy, Deputy Chair of the Management Department at US-based George Washington University, told University World News that no matter what “innovative” ideas were generated by student accommodations, there would always be “a greater risk when many people live so close together”.

“Currently, accommodations are high-risk, so we must think of other options to ensure students are capable of learning in a COVID-19 environment,” El Tarabishy added.

He said a big question that came to mind was: “Do universities have the large but necessary budgets to ensure that all precautions are being taken?”

“In my opinion, if universities are able to take on the enormous costs of re-modelling their accommodations, then they would certainly be able to invest in their students by offering them the hardware and software necessary for digital learning,” El Tarabishy said.

“Let’s let online learning be one of the many assets that we give our students”, El Tarabishy said.

Arts & Entrepreneurship: A Marriage made on Earth?

Arts & Entrepreneurship: A Marriage made on Earth?

Arts & Entrepreneurship: A Marriage made on Earth?

Monday, August, 3, 2020

Arts & Entrepreneurship: A Marriage made on Earth?

Monday, August, 3, 2020

How does Art and Entrepreneurship work together in Harmony?

It wasn’t that long ago on Monday, 29 June that an ICSB workshop on the Society for Arts Entrepreneurship Education with Todd Stuart and Josef Hanson was held. That workshop prompted by membership of this dynamic body. Indeed, the workshop resonates with my
newfound love in exploring the intersection of business (including marketing & entrepreneurship) with the Arts.

Just to provide a brief context, in my recently published book chapter on Arts Marketing, I explored the longstanding debate between the notions of ‘arts marketing’ vis-à-vis ‘marketing of the arts’. That study delved into various art forms – visual, poetry, literature, music and the performing arts (theatre, dance, film and music), and the intersections of these forms, and provides insights on how to mitigate any identified challenges confronting the arts marketing discipline – arguably the ‘new normal’ of cultural products and/or production, embellished with heritage cues – and sometimes discussed under the label of the ‘creative industries’ (Read more…).

A Humane Entrepreneurial Oriented Professor

A Humane Entrepreneurial Oriented Professor

A Humane Entrepreneurial Oriented Professor

Saturday, August, 1, 2020 by Dr. Ayman El Tarabishy

The global pandemic has allowed academia to change fundamentally, and within that, there is a chance for educators to evolve.

Estimated at the end of last year, ICSB foresaw a dramatic change in the role of the “educator,” be that for entrepreneurial and small business studies or other subjects. This global reshape has led professors and lecturers to confront the barriers posed by responses to the worldwide health crisis. Professor Hooi Den Huan of Singapore described today’s environment as R.U.D.E or rapidly changing, uncertain, dynamic, and engaging. ICSB focused this understanding of our modern environment on educators, expanding that the instructors themselves will evolve from being “bearers of information” to being R.U.D.E. In rapidly changing their knowledge base to grasp new theories and their applications, they will steer the education ship to a safe port of reflection and learning, while mastering engagement. Educators will do more than teach, entertain, and educate. However, they will engage their learners in the real journey of reflection, double-loop learning, and personal growth.

This assumption proves to be more accurate every day. We need to confront the reality that our current pedagogy, of entrepreneurship specifically, must change if we still find it essential to create prepared entrepreneurs. As our universities alter their structure and systems, we can not remain the same entrepreneurship professors that we were last year, nor even yesterday. We must change with the times, and I argue that this change must be centered around the care and growth of the individual, be that student, staff, faculty, etc. If we can engage with the principles of Humane Entrepreneurship, and in so doing, safeguard the value and potential of the human person, we will be able to adapt our methods to fit our environment more easily.

Remembering a conversation last month with Norris Krueger, he introduced the idea of the “Great Re-think,” during which he recommended that we move beyond thinking to entirely reimagining and recreating universities. The global pandemic has allowed academia to change fundamentally, and within that, there is a chance for educators to evolve. Rather than being derived from the changes in academia, the extension of the professor towards Humane Entrepreneurship will ultimately guide us towards creating more accessible and inclusive programs for students. The educator’s intention of HumEnt will lead to creative results, including the bridging of exclusivity gaps among institutions and overcoming unspoken priority so that younger scholars can access innovative and desirable solutions.

Each educator has a higher mandate to educate as many students as possible. The new format of e-learning does not limit this mandate but instead motivates its expansion. If educators can be culture-creating leaders who exemplify the practice of Humane Entrepreneurship, we might bring about a knowledge revolution that works towards equitable and empowering inclusion.

Given the recent transition in leadership at ICSB, we have spent a lot of time thinking about our origins (as back as 1955), during which we have asked the crucial questions: “Does our pedagogy still hold up in our new world,” “Are our systems optimized for the success and growth of our members?”, and “How can ICSB be present to the needs of our members today and tomorrow?” Upon discussing these questions, we have concluded that ICSB is an essential platform (community) for the advancement of entrepreneurship and that our programming holds significant influence over the skillsets of our members. For this reason, and in response to our greater call as educators to provide helpful and creative solutions to the problems before us, ICSB will be opening a new program on Monday (8/3/2020). Named the ICSB Educator 300, this digital database will represent a collection of the world’s most capable high-level educators of the future. Our goal is to limit the number of professors, lecturers, and teachers to 300 to be sure that we can manage the database, connect the database with top universities around the world (to ensure the database’s professors have favorable opportunities), and provide continuing education for these 300 educators as they evolve to the new online, hybrid, and hyflex models of education and teaching.

Please join us as we enter this new world together. Guided by the principles of Humane Entrepreneurship, we are sure to succeed and to bring about real and essential change throughout our global community.

Article by:

Dr. Ayman El Tarabishy
President & CEO, ICSB
Deputy Chair, Department of Management, GW School of Business

 
Global Youth Academy Recap

Global Youth Academy Recap

The ICSB Global Youth Academy Recap

Friday, July, 31, 2020 By Skye Blanks ICSB Global Youth Academy Program Chair

It has been a week since the end of the ICSB Global Youth Academy, but I am still in a state of amazement due to all the incredible participants I had the pleasure of meeting.

The ICSB Global Youth Academy was a two-week program hosted virtually. This was an incredible opportunity for high school juniors and seniors, during which they experienced perspective-shifting and changing presentations and activities. As entrepreneurs, we understand the value of the self. That is why this program taught students ways in which they represent and embody their brand and company (you, Inc.). By investing in themselves, this academy helped students begin preparing themselves for their futures ahead, which has never been more pertinent.

The program worked on a three-part model, known as “the 3 Ss.” Within this framework, students discovered world Systems, their Skills, and theirSelf. Systems include those national and international organizations that uphold all of our current world relations and markets. These include, but are not exclusive to, the United Nations, the International Labour Organization, the World Bank Group, and the World Health Organization. Next, we helped them discover their skills, through the creation of a final presentation about a new venture relating to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. Students also learned the ways in which they can optimize their skills and build their portfolio. The last and innermost element was the Self. By learning how to become more proximate with their strengths and weaknesses, students were able to promote themselves and their work even more than they imagined.

Entrepreneurship training is not restrained solely for entrepreneurs. Rather, entrepreneurship training introduces an innovative and important way of seeing the world through eyes of opportunity. This structural positivity will help these students succeed in any and every space that their future life involves. In participating in this renowned, international program, they have officially begun their entrepreneurial journey.

Special Congratulations to all the winners during the two week program!

Skye Blanks
ICSB Global Youth Academy Program Chair

 

 

 

 

 

#AOM2020 Features and Opportunities

#AOM2020 Features and Opportunities

#AOM2020 Features and Opportunities

Thursday, July, 30, 2020

Academy of Management Vice President and Program Chair Herman Aguinis and Vice President Elect Amy Hillman talk about the innovative options in this year’s virtual meeting.