Pioneering Research on Job Creation and Destruction Awarded 100,000 Euros

Pioneering Research on Job Creation and Destruction Awarded 100,000 Euros

Pioneering Research on Job Creation and Destruction Awarded 100,000 Euros

Monday, March, 2, 2020

Pioneering Research on Job Creation and Destruction Awarded 100,000 Euros

Monday, March, 2, 2020

The 2020 Global Award for Entrepreneurship Research goes to John Haltiwanger, Professor of Economics at University of Maryland, USA

Haltiwanger is awarded for his pioneering research advancing our understanding of job creation and destruction, productivity growth, and the role of small business and entrepreneurial firms in economic development. The Global Award is the foremost international award in entrepreneurship research with a prize sum of € 100,000.

Professor John Haltiwanger has made significant contributions to the field of entrepreneurship by improving our understanding of job creation and destruction, productivity growth, and the role of small and medium-sized firms (SMEs) in economic development. He has played a major role in the careful development of large, longitudinal firm-level datasets, and introduced a novel and widely adopted measure of firm growth that addresses previous statistical biases. His work has influenced public policy and national statistical offices around the world.

Professor Haltiwanger’s most important contributions include:
• To question the conventional wisdom of the job creation ability of small business. He provides evidence that large and mature firms account for most of the newly created manufacturing jobs, and that these jobs are of higher quality than those in SMEs in that they are more likely to persist in subsequent years.
• To show the importance of firm age as opposed to size: the job creation in small firms takes place in the first few years of their existence, as captured in the “up-or-out” dynamics.
• The decomposition of productivity growth into contributions from continuing, entering, and exiting firms. He shows that the largest component of growth can be attributed to continuing firms improving their productivity over time.

The Award ceremony will take place in Stockholm on May 11. For further information, please visit our website, www.e-award.org.

The Global Award for Entrepreneurship Research is the foremost global award for research on entrepreneurship. The Award honors significant contributions to theory-building on entrepreneurship and small business development. The Award consists of the statuette ”The Hand of God” by the Swedish sculptor Carl Milles and a prize amount of 100 000 Euros.

Founder of the Award: Swedish Entrepreneurship Forum. Co-founder: The Research Institute of Industrial Economics (IFN). Sponsor: Vinnova – Sweden´s Innovation Agency. Donor: Lars Backsell.

STI Forum 2020 5th annual Multi-stakeholder Forum on Science, Technology and Innovation for the Sustainable Development Goals 12 – 13 May 2020

STI Forum 2020 5th annual Multi-stakeholder Forum on Science, Technology and Innovation for the Sustainable Development Goals 12 – 13 May 2020

STI Forum 2020 5th annual Multi-stakeholder Forum on Science, Technology and Innovation for the Sustainable Development Goals12 – 13 May 2020

Monday, March, 2, 2020

STI Forum 2020 5th annual Multi-stakeholder Forum on Science, Technology and Innovation for the Sustainable Development Goals12 – 13 May 2020

Monday, March, 2, 2020

Call for Innovations!

The United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, in collaboration with the Global Innovation Exchange (GIE), has initiated its 2020 Call for Innovations to help implement the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The call, which is open from now until 9 March, 2020, is open for innovators, scientists, entrepreneurs and sustainability change agents worldwide to submit their workable solutions for SDG implementation, particularly through one or more of the six “entry points” identified in the Global Sustainable Development Report:

  1. Human well-being and capabilities
  2. Sustainable and just economies
  3. Sustainable food systems and healthy nutrition
  4. Energy decarbonization with universal access
  5. Urban and peri-urban development
  6. Global environmental commons

The selected innovators will be invited to participate in the 2020 STI Forum at UN Headquarters in New York on May 12 and 13. At the Forum innovators will have the chance to present their innovation and connect with a valuable network – other innovators, those who can support or scale up your innovations, and those seeking to utilize such innovations. 

This year’s Call for Innovations is hosted on a GIE Custom site and will use GIE’s innovation profiles as applications for the contest. As part of this partnership, all innovators who respond to the Call will be automatically featured on Global Innovation Exchange (GIE) which brings many other benefits such as: 

  1. Ability to showcase the innovation’s accomplishments and milestones, making it easier to tell the innovation’s story. Innovation profiles will be featured on GIE indefinitely here.
  2. Exposure to funders and other supporters through initiatives such as GIE’s Innovation Finder Service
  3. Opportunity to apply for other similar opportunities in the future using the same innovation profile.
  4. In 2020, GIE will launch automatic funding alerts based on your innovation profile details. For now, discover the funding opportunities that fit your innovation here.

The purpose of this Call for Innovations is to support existing innovative solutions by creating networks and communities among people who are developing technological innovations, those who can support or scale up such innovations, and those who need such innovations in order to implement the SDGs. Innovations are sought from diverse backgrounds, including women, youth, Indigenous peoples, and open collaborative networks.

Innovations can be submitted before 9 March 2020 via Global Innovation Exchange at https://stiforum4sdgs.globalinnovationexchange.org.

The Butterfly Effect for MSMEs

The Butterfly Effect for MSMEs

The Butterfly Effect for MSMEs

Monday, March, 2, 2020

The Butterfly Effect for MSMEs

Monday, March, 2, 2020

Can Small Changes in Entrepreneurship Lead to New Global Outcomes?

What does the “I” in globalization represent? Perhaps it is the individual small business owner, trying to eke out a living. The incubation of innovation by institutions triples the “I” as universities and foundations that support university research establish formal operations designed to help individuals who are potential entrepreneurs actually initiate entrepreneurial ventures. Or it might be investment innovations designed to increase profits for financial institutions.
 
An underlying metaphor for all of the above is known as “the butterfly effect.” In its best-known form, the butterfly effect shows how the flap of a butterfly’s wings in Brazil has a tiny (but crucial) effect on the wind in the immediate vicinity. This, in turn, has a stronger effect on wind patterns and, ultimately, on weather. The final effect, carried out after a long series of increasingly strong impacts, is to create a tornado in Texas. Consider how each of the following actual and potential butterfly effects, represent one or another interpretation of the “I” in global (Read more…).
The Other Half: State, Challenges, and Action Items for the Realization of Women Entrepreneurial Opportunities Worldwide

The Other Half: State, Challenges, and Action Items for the Realization of Women Entrepreneurial Opportunities Worldwide

The Other Half: State, Challenges, and Action Items for the Realization of Women Entrepreneurial Opportunities Worldwide

Monday, February, 24, 2020

The Other Half: State, Challenges, and Action Items for the Realization of Women Entrepreneurial Opportunities Worldwide

Monday, February, 24, 2020

Is there Systemic Bias Towards Segregated Gender Roles in Society that is Constraining Women Potential in Entrepreneurship?

According to the United Nations, the world population reached 7.6 billion in 2017. About half, or 49.55 percent, were female (United Nations, Department of Social and Economic Affairs, 2017). The fact that the gender demographics on the planet are balanced, compounded by the recent announcement that most countries have achieved gender parity in primary education (UNICEF, 2018) should be cause for optimism. However, these numbers are quickly obscured by the realization that disparities still remain at the other education grades, which disproportionately favor males.

President James Madison once stated that “education is the foundation of civil liberties.” Therefore, this gender unbalanced state of affairs might also escalate to the structure of several other institutions, including public and private sector activities, and the distribution of entrepreneurial opportunities.In this brief report, we review selected gender indicators across countries, and then compare them with entrepreneurial indicators in an attempt to understand the distribution of business opportunities across economies. After reviewing the general numbers, we focus on key challenges and practical recommendations for action (Read more…).

Humane Entrepreneurship – Thinking Paper Series Issue 2

Humane Entrepreneurship – Thinking Paper Series Issue 2

Humane Entrepreneurship – Thinking Paper Series Issue 2

Sunday, February, 23, 2020

Humane Entrepreneurship – Thinking Paper Series Issue 2

Sunday, February, 23, 2020

Humane Entrepreneurship is More than Just a Label

As humans, we tend to label everything; we love to define things to help things make sense or to grasp at understanding. But a label is so short, and people are expected to make a judgment, decision, or grasp an idea based on just a couple of words. But there might be so much more to something than just it’s label. There might be an entire concept wrapped up neatly within the packaging of those 2 or 3 words. Words like Humane Entrepreneurship.

What comes to mind when you read those two words—Humane Entrepreneurship? Some might just dismiss it as yet another business model in a world full of ever-changing and competitive business ideas. Some may associate it with a good cause or general humanitarian efforts. Yet Humane Entrepreneurship is more than just a label. It’s a concept that encompasses a whole idea.

What is the concept of Humane Entrepreneurship?

Humane Entrepreneurship as a concept promotes the ideas of human and corporate growth played out simultaneously, as well as protection of and the responsible use of natural resources. When the concept of Humane Entrepreneurship becomes a culture in a company, it influences the innovation performance through, not only attitudes, values, beliefs, and behavior, but also company-wide management practices, processes, and protocols. Decision-making within the company would be based on what is good for its employees, its business, and the environment all at the same time.

When companies adopt the concept of Humane Entrepreneurship, they are starting a positive cycle (also known as a virtuous cycle) within, a cycle that keeps itself going to the benefit of the company and its employees. It begins with entrepreneurship and well-managed leadership which establishes a company culture or environment. This positive environment encourages, enthusiastically looks for, and nurtures innovation from its employees. That innovation leads to an increased financial performance by the company, which in turn encourages new job creation, which then leads back to entrepreneurship, beginning the cycle once again. Similar to a sustained natural cycle like the water cycle (rain fill bodies of water, sun evaporates the water, water vapor condenses into clouds, clouds produce rain), the components of this virtuous cycle are able feed off of each other and continue to produce good results, allowing the cycle to sustain itself long-term.

Humane Entrepreneurship from a scientific and research standpoint:

From a science and research standpoint, the concept of Humane Entrepreneurship may be considered a hypothesis. By definition, a hypothesis is a concept or ‘idea that is tested through study and experimentation’. It has also been explained as “something more than a wild guess but less than a well-established theory”; a theory being a reasonable idea or explanation that is scientifically acceptable and has been tested over a long period of time to reach a conclusion. But for an idea or concept to be scientifically acceptable, it has to be looked at and tested from many angles. Its conclusion is based on hard facts with the solid proof being given as evidence that it is true.

Currently, we have been working on taking Humane Entrepreneurship from the tiny seeds of a concept to a hypothesis that is being tested and researched, with the aim of making it a theory that is widely accepted. The challenge is taking something as intangible as a concept, something that you can’t see or touch, and being able to give it substance and measurement through words, mathematics, and formulas. But can a concept, the concept of Humane Entrepreneurship, actually be measured? Our next article will explore that question.

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In the progress of this discussion, I shall endeavor to give a satisfactory answer to all the objections which shall have made their appearance.

Written by Dr. Ayman El Tarabishy

ICSB Executive Director
Deputy Chair, Department of Management
GW School of Business
Washington DC
aymanelt@icsb.org