Salute to Health Care Providers

Salute to Health Care Providers

A Salute to Health Care Providers 

Friday, April 3, 2020

A Salute to Health Care Providers

Friday, April 3, 2020

Dear Health Care Providers,

Thank you.

Of all the words I could think of to start this letter to you, those had to be the first. Yet those words seem so pale and ordinary, weak words to express appreciation for strong deeds. Like many of the pioneering doctors, nurses, medical assistants, and others in the healthcare field before you, you have a long history of striving to dramatically improve the care of sick patients. It’s not different today; it’s no different in your case.

We know that your job goes beyond a single duty. You not only continuously care for those of us who are sick, injured, disabled, or dying, but you take on the responsibility of encouraging good health among families and communities, even when people close their ears to your sound advice. We know you are also busily involved in health care research, management, policy deliberations, and patient advocacy. It’s a full plate. Yet you’re not done there. Along with your job, you also juggle family life and higher education schooling. It’s truly impressive and not for the weak-willed.

But now the crisis has struck, and you are being asked to add even more to your plate. You are our first defense and our frontline–the place only the bravest dared to fight–in the battle against COVID-19. You are asked to go up against an unseen enemy, even asked to do so without adequate protection and amidst dwindling supplies. You’ve already made so many sacrifices, and yet you are being asked to make more, even at risk to your health, at the risk of losing sleep and rest, at the cost of being with your families.

As a Deputy Chair of the Department of Management at The George Washington School of Business and Executive Director of ICSB, I have always stressed the importance of cultivating empathy and humanity—a human touch when it comes to dealing with others—but you already had it. It’s why you are a healthcare provider in the first place. It’s your vocation and your passion. You carry that empathy and humanity through your exhaustion, under often difficult circumstances, and somehow find the emotional strength to comfort the sick, the dying, and their loved ones. How can anyone call all this less than heroic?

So, to all the brave health care providers—women and men—the moms, the dads, the sons, the daughters, the heroes, the fighters, the leaders, for your sacrifices. We can only end this letter with the sincerest and most grateful, thank you!

We ask all the ICSB and GW Family to do a Local Salute to all on the front lines of the coronavirus fight every evening by applauding them from your balconies or patios.

 Please check what time it is conducted in your Neighborhood. If not, please start it!

Article written by:

Dr. Ayman El Tarabishy
ICSB Executive Director
Deputy Chair of Department of Management at George Washington University School of Business

Academic enterprise and regional economic growth Towards an enterprising university

Academic enterprise and regional economic growth Towards an enterprising university

Academic enterprise and
regional economic growth Towards an enterprising university

Monday, March, 30, 2020

Academic enterprise and
regional economic growth Towards an enterprising university

Monday, March, 30, 2020

The role of Universities and Economic Development

In this paper we investigate the attempt by a large, post-1992 UK university to influence regional economic development by becoming a more enterprising institution. The pivotal role that universities play in the knowledge economy results from the changing economic and political environment (O’Shea et al,2004; Slaughter and Leslie, 1997). Increasing globalization and the emergence of a knowledge-based economy, together with the growing significance of innovative city-regions, are the main drivers in the transformation of UK universities (Hagen, 2002; Sizer, 2001). Policy makers now see universities as key players in delivering economic growth: this is evident from the range of government initiatives that have been proposed and/or subsequently introduced (DfES, 2003; DTI, 1998, 2000; HMT et al, 2004; Lambert, 2003; Leitch, 2006). Similar developments are apparent in both developed and developing countries (Ahola, 2005; Gomes et al, 2005; Jacob et al, 2003; Van Vught, 1999; Zhao, 2004). Governments around the world now see universities as key players in developing innovation systems and, thereby, contributing to economic growth (Bercovitz and Feldman, 2006; Etzkowitz et al, 2000) (Read more…).

Motivations and Aspirations: Why Do People Start  or Run a Business?

Motivations and Aspirations: Why Do People Start or Run a Business?

Motivations and Aspirations: Why Do People Start
or Run a Business?

Monday, March, 22, 2020

Motivations and Aspirations: Why Do People Start
or Run a Business?

Monday, March, 22, 2020

Introduction and Some Changes

As noted earlier, there may be almost as many reasons for starting a business as there are people willing to start them. These can include striving to make a difference, seeking higher income and wealth, the desire for independence and autonomy, continuing a family tradition, or simply the lack of alternative job options. These reasons matter, and illustrate the overall socio-economic conditions in which individuals operate: for example, if there is a strong desire for independence or if jobs are seen as scarce. Similarly, the expectations and aspirations of those starting a business are important, including how many people they expect to employ, the anticipated scope of the customer base (e.g. the local area, rest of country, abroad), the proportion of revenue expected from international sales and, finally, the novelty of the business’s products or services, and the technology and processes it uses. All of these dimensions will be considered in this chapter.

Since its inception, GEM has distinguished between opportunity and necessity as primary motivations for entrepreneurial activity. However, there has been growing recognition that this dichotomy may not fully reflect the nuances in motivations for founding contemporary startups. Following extensive debate, review and piloting, some significant changes were incorporated into the 2019 GEM Adult Population Survey (APS) to allow a more nuanced approach.(Read more…).

Entrepreneurial Activity Across the Globe in 2019

Entrepreneurial Activity Across the Globe in 2019

Entrepreneurial Activity Across the Globe in 2019

Monday, March, 16, 2020

Entrepreneurial Activity Across the Globe in 2019

Monday, March, 16, 2020

 Levels of Entrepreneurial Activity in 2019

This chapter reports on levels of entrepreneurial activity across the world. Economies differ considerably in terms of their engagement in entrepreneurial activities. Some of these differences reflect the way in which entrepreneurial activity manifests itself: in some economies there are large numbers of self-employed and startup activities; in other economies there are relatively more established and medium-sized firms; while in others entrepreneurial employees (often termed “intrapreneurs”) within existing companies are prevalent. As noted in Chapter 1, GEM takes a broad approach towards entrepreneurship. Accordingly, this chapter includes the following measures

  • The proportion of adults who are actively engaged in starting or running new businesses in each. economy (Total early-stage Entrepreneurial Activity [TEA]);
  • The proportion of adults owning and managing an established businesses;
  • The sector distribution of entrepreneurship;
  • The proportion of adults involved in Entrepreneurial Employee Activity (EEA) as part of their role in existing organizations.

These different manifestations of entrepreneurial activity each contribute to a sustainable economy in their own way. While startups mirror dynamism and potentially

“creative destruction” (where new businesses challenge and replace obsolete ones), intrapreneurs can ensure continuous innovation in larger organizations. At the same time, owner-managers in established firms (mostly classified as small or medium-sized enterprises) often form an important backbone to an economy and society.

(Read more…).

The Social and Cultural Foundations of Entrepreneurship

The Social and Cultural Foundations of Entrepreneurship

The Social and Cultural Foundations of Entrepreneurship

Monday, March, 9, 2020

The Social and Cultural Foundations of Entrepreneurship

Monday, March, 9, 2020

What is the Foundation of Entrepreneurship Around the World?

The decision to start a new business is the product of an individual’s attitudes, perceptions and intentions, set within a social, cultural and political context that could support or constrain that decision. Some societies readily embrace enduring traditions of entrepreneurship and trade, yet others see enterprise as a relatively new characteristic of an economy in transition. Whatever the cultural context, to be successful the entrepreneur must rely on a wide range of stakeholders, including investors, employees, suppliers and customers, as well as the tacit support of family and friends.

Then entrepreneurship is a social and cultural phenomenon that is reflected in the GEM Adult Population Survey (APS) questionnaire by asking whether the individual knows someone who has recently started a new business, whether there are currently good opportunities to start a new business in the local area, and how easy it is to start a business in their country. Knowing someone else who has started their own business can increase awareness of entrepreneurship, as well as heighten appreciation of the associated costs and benefits, and can provide the potential entrepreneur with a benchmark. Knowing other entrepreneurs means exposure to role models and mentors, hardwires the motivating factors or drivers for being successful, and provides connections to relevant stakeholders and advice. Seeing good opportunities to start a business may indicate that innovation potential exists, and also points to an ability to recognize such opportunities. Finally, considering whether or not it is easy to start a business can reflect how people perceive the environment as enabling or constraining to entrepreneurial activity (Read more…).

The Butterfly Effect for MSMEs

The Butterfly Effect for MSMEs

The Butterfly Effect for MSMEs

Monday, March, 2, 2020

The Butterfly Effect for MSMEs

Monday, March, 2, 2020

Can Small Changes in Entrepreneurship Lead to New Global Outcomes?

What does the “I” in globalization represent? Perhaps it is the individual small business owner, trying to eke out a living. The incubation of innovation by institutions triples the “I” as universities and foundations that support university research establish formal operations designed to help individuals who are potential entrepreneurs actually initiate entrepreneurial ventures. Or it might be investment innovations designed to increase profits for financial institutions.
 
An underlying metaphor for all of the above is known as “the butterfly effect.” In its best-known form, the butterfly effect shows how the flap of a butterfly’s wings in Brazil has a tiny (but crucial) effect on the wind in the immediate vicinity. This, in turn, has a stronger effect on wind patterns and, ultimately, on weather. The final effect, carried out after a long series of increasingly strong impacts, is to create a tornado in Texas. Consider how each of the following actual and potential butterfly effects, represent one or another interpretation of the “I” in global (Read more…).
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