The Role of Micro-Small and Medium Enterprises in Achieving the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals

The Role of Micro-Small and Medium Enterprises in Achieving the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals

The Role of Micro-Small and Medium Enterprises in Achieving the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals

Monday, January, 27, 2020

The Role of Micro-Small and Medium Enterprises in Achieving the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals

January, Monday, 27, 2020

Can Micro-Small and Medium Enterprises Be Part of the Solution to Reach the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals?

There is less empirical evidence on MSMEs growth in developing and emerging economies than in the developed world. MSMEs in developing and developed countries are faced with different challenges. Many MSMEs in developing countries are still informally organized enterprises limiting their longevity and wider contributions they make towards the SDGs. There are also questions on how formalization of the economy ought to take place.
 
Moreover, demands and challenges vary within the micro, small and medium enterprises cluster itself demands and challenges faced by micro enterprises are different from those faced by small and medium enterprises. Studies show that the growth of MSMEs in developing and least developed countries (LDCs) dominate in sectors which are labor intensive and possess low barriers to entry, including agriculture and agribusiness, manufacturing and service sector.
 
Women, youth and other vulnerable groups face more difficult challenges in MSME development. Women and youth MSME entrepreneurs, for example, particularly those from rural poor communities, are often further disadvantaged in growing their business, lacking land deeds and/or collateral needed to access formal sources of credit.
 
Other challenges include limited access to finance and lack of capacity and knowledge, particularly with regards to business development, marketing and strategic management skills (Read more…).
The Need For Nurturing Entrepreneurship

The Need For Nurturing Entrepreneurship

The Need For Nurturing Entrepreneurship

Monday, January, 20, 2020

The Need For Nurturing Entrepreneurship

January, Monday, 20, 2020

Should there be a focus on Promoting and Developing Digital Entrepreneurs Nationally and Internationally?

Europe and mainly Italy is the land of family businesses mostly categorized as small to medium enterprises. They are recognized to be the backbone of the current economy, enhancing international and local growth. Those companies have been surviving transferring their know-how from generation to the next generation. They have been increasing the employability rate and improving the wealth state of their own country.
 
But nowadays everywhere people, social media, and others voice out that those family businesses are looking outside their local territory, going to develop their business because it is cheap and more convenient. The employment rate is getting lower and the overall sentiment about the future economy is not so great. Young people are moving abroad to spot their lucky chance. Yet, the need for entrepreneurship is urgently emerging. Universities are designing programs to connect young people with opportunities to progress and empower them on their journey towards employment.
 
It gives students in higher education the chance to create their own company while still pursuing their studies (Read more…).
Revitalizing Rural Areas Through the Power of Social Entrepreneurship

Revitalizing Rural Areas Through the Power of Social Entrepreneurship

Revitalizing Rural Areas Through the Power of Social Entrepreneurship

Monday, January 13, 2020

Revitalizing Rural Areas Through the Power of Social Entrepreneurship

Monday, January 13, 2020

Can Social Entrepreneurship Make Rural Communities More Livable?

An Overlooked Majority?

African cities are growing rapidly, but an estimated two-thirds of African people still live in rural areas. In some African nations, the ratio of rural: urban dwellers are even higher. In Burundi, in central Africa, it’s almost 9:1 – which gives some idea of the importance of the countryside.

However, numbers alone aren’t always enough to ensure that politicians based in capital cities focus on their rural populations. Providing necessary infrastructure in rural areas is much harder than it is in cities, which can lead to rural people feeling that their needs are not being considered.

Many approaches have been taken to addressing this, but so far, no single proposed solution has proven to be universally successful or appropriate. This presents an opportunity (and a need) for a rethink, and in this article, I’ll propose social entrepreneurship as a viable alternative. (Read more…)

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The Genesis of the New Journal of the International Council for Small Business (JICSB)

The Genesis of the New Journal of the International Council for Small Business (JICSB)

The Genesis of the New Journal of the International Council for Small Business (JICSB)

Monday, January 6, 2020

The Genesis of the New Journal of the International Council for Small Business (JICSB)

Monday, January 6, 2020

ICSB Response to the Call of the United Nations

Today, more than ever, companies are looking at their core business, as well as philanthropy, advocacy, and partnerships, to support society, improve human life and also contribute to profitability. Sustainable development cannot be achieved by the United Nations alone, as shown in the UN Secretary-General’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) Progress Report and the Global Sustainable Development Report. It is obvious, we will struggle to achieve the 2030 Agenda unless we join forces with every stakeholder and scale up our efforts toward the implementation of the SDGs.

ICSB was the lead organization to propose and ask the support and leadership of the Republic of Argentina to help move forward a resolution to the United Nations (UN) to create an International Day dedicated to Micro-, Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (MSMEs). According to the data provided by the International Council for Small Business (ICSB), formal and informal MSMEs make up over 90% of all firms and account on average for 60-70% of total employment and 50% of GDP. MSMEs are the first responders to societal needs.

The UN General Assembly, recognizing the importance of these enterprises, decided to declare June 27 the Micro-, Small and Medium-Sized enterprises Day to raise public awareness of their many contributions to sustainable development. Each June 27, the world will celebrate Micro-, Small and Medium-sized Enterprises Day. These enterprises, which generally employ fewer than 250 persons, are the backbones of most economies worldwide and play a key role in developing countries. These types of enterprises are responsible for significant employment and income generation opportunities across the world and have been identified as a major driver of poverty alleviation and development. (Read more…)

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ICSB 2019 Top Pictures

ICSB 2019 Top Pictures

ICSB 2019 Best Pictures – Memories for a Lifetime

December 30, 2019

ICSB Celebrates a Great 2019 Year

A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words

ICSB members took thousands of photographs in 2019 — from Egypt, Argentina, Mexico, France, S. Korea, Indonesia, Australia, Italy, Macao, United States, and many more to mention. We talked with content experts, researchers, activists, authors, entrepreneurs, micro-business owners, the youth, and influencers, and got them all on camera with one mission. How do we support micro-small and medium-sized enterprises worldwide! 

The gallery below showcases some of the great pictures taken in 2019. For this piece, we only picked images that meant something to us, whether because the photo captured a moment in a powerful story, showcased the skill and creativeness of ICSB members, or it was just a great photograph. We know our members probably have more to share. Yet, we leave it to everyone to share! 

Thank you ICSB Family for a Great 2019. We move Onward and Upward. 

To View the ICSB Top Ten Trends for 2020 (click here).

The Role of Entrepreneurship Educators and Researchers in Addressing the UN’s Sustainability and Development Goals

The Role of Entrepreneurship Educators and Researchers in Addressing the UN’s Sustainability and Development Goals

The Role of Entrepreneurship Educators and Researchers in Addressing the UN’s Sustainability and Development Goals

Monday, December 30, 2019

The Role of Entrepreneurship Educators and Researchers in Addressing the UN’s Sustainability and Development Goals

Monday, December 30, 2019

What Role Do Today’s Entrepreneurship Educators Play?

Last year I had the privilege of participating in the International Council for Small Business’ annual conference at the United Nations in celebration of the UN’s Micro, Small and Medium Size Enterprise Day (MSME). The topic of my talk focused on the role of entrepreneurship educators and researchers in working with the UN to address its 17 Sustainability and Development Goals. I talked about the well known linkage between the level of entrepreneurial activity in any given region and its effect on economic development. I also talked about the idea of recognizing entrepreneurs as problem solvers, especially in the context of addressing social issues. Closely linked to this talk at last year’s conference, past ICSB President Ki-Chan Kim emphasized the importance of adopting a philosophy and practice of “humane entrepreneurship”. In fact, at the close of last year’s conference, all attending delegates engaged in a signing ceremony to endorse ICSB’s support for promoting and adopting a humane and empathetic approach to the formation and management of growth oriented ventures.

For purposes of this discussion, I think it is important to clarify what I mean by levels of entrepreneurial activity. As Acs (2006) points out in his work in connection with the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) project, it is first important to define how we measure entrepreneurial activity. Measurement issues can significantly influence how we make inferences regarding regional economic development. The GEM Project differentiates between “necessity based” entrepreneurship and “opportunity based” entrepreneurship. Necessity based entrepreneurship implies that individuals resort to a simple form of self employment because there exists very little to no other options at established organizations. Thus for regions characterized by high levels of necessity based entrepreneurs, we may infer that economic development is suppressed due to the lack of higher paying alternative employment opportunities. Alternatively, opportunity based entrepreneurship implies that individuals proactively choose an entrepreneurial path because they have recognized an opportunity and endeavor to exploit it through creative or innovative means. Accordingly. there seems to be a greater chance of improved regional economic development in areas where opportunity based entrepreneurs can flourish. From this perspective, opportunity based entrepreneurs may be more prone to undertake the challenges of building growth oriented organizations and thus contributing to the viability of a region. (Read more…).

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