Actionable Recommendations for Narrowing the Science-Practice Gap in Open Science

Actionable Recommendations for Narrowing the Science-Practice Gap in Open Science

Actionable Recommendations for Narrowing the Science-Practice Gap in Open Science

By: Herman Aguinis, George C. Banks, Steven G. Rogelberg, Wayne F. Cascio

Originally published online: March 3, 2020

ABSTRACT

Efforts to promote open-science practices are, to a large extent, driven by a need to reduce questionable research practices (QRPs). There is ample evidence that QRPs are corrosive because they make research opaque and therefore challenge the credibility, trustworthiness, and usefulness of the scientific knowledge that is produced. A literature based on false-positive results that will not replicate is not only scientifically misleading but also worthless for anyone who wants to put knowledge to use. So, a question then arises: Why are these QRPs still so pervasive and why do gatekeepers of scientific knowledge such as journal editors, reviewers, funding- agency panel members, and board members of professional organizations in charge of journal policies not seem to be taking decisive actions about QRPs? We address these questions by using a science-practice gap analogy to identify the existence of a science-practice gap in open science. Specifically, although there is abundant research on how to reduce QRPs, many gatekeepers are not adopting this knowledge in their practices. Drawing upon the literatures on the more general science- practice gap and QRPs, we offer 10 actionable recommendations for narrowing the specific science-practice gap in open science. Our recommendations require little effort, time, and financial resources. Importantly, they are explicit about the resulting benefits for the various research-production stakeholders (i.e., authors and gatekeepers). By translating findings on open-science research into actionable recommendations for “practitioners of research”, we hope to encourage more transparent, credible, and reproducible research that can be trusted and used by consumers of that research.

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A Message from UNICEF Executive Director, Henrietta H. Fore

A Message from UNICEF Executive Director, Henrietta H. Fore

A Message from UNICEF Executive Director, Henrietta H. Fore

Sunday, March, 22, 2020

A Message from UNICEF Executive Director, Henrietta H. Fore

Sunday, March, 22, 2020

UNICEF Executive Director, Henrietta H. Fore offers her tips on social distancing and getting through these times stuck at home.

José Andrés says “people have to eat,” so his shuttered restaurants are now community kitchens

José Andrés says “people have to eat,” so his shuttered restaurants are now community kitchens

José Andrés says “people have to eat,” so his shuttered restaurants are now community kitchens

Sunday, March, 22, 2020 By Tim Carman, Washington Post

José Andrés says “people have to eat,” so his shuttered restaurants are now community kitchens

Sunday, March, 22, 2020 By Tim Carman, Washington Post

Workers were affixing small black-and-white signs to the stone patio outside Zaytinya on Tuesday morning, each one exactly six feet from the next. The signs indicated where customers for one of ThinkFoodGroup’s new community kitchens should stand while waiting for meals outside a restaurant that would be, under normal circumstances, packed with lunchtime diners.
 
But Zaytinya was closed, one of hundreds of restaurants and bars across the city affected by the D.C. government’s order on Monday to stop all dine-in service. The clampdown is part of a growing movement to curtail public gatherings and “flatten the curve,” the popular shorthand for limiting the spread of coronavirus by dramatically cutting back on social interactions. As the virus has spread, public officials have steadily lowered their recommended numbers for public gatherings: first 1,000, then 250, then 50 and now 10.
 
José Andrés understands the importance of these recommendations. They can save lives. But he also understands people need to be fed, especially those households that have relied on (now closed) public schools to feed their children or don’t have the means to stockpile their pantries for weeks on end, as the coronavirus strangles a service industry that employs millions of hourly American workers. So Andrés, the face of ThinkFoodGroup and the man who leads a small army of chefs and volunteers in humanitarian efforts around the globe, has decided to forge ahead and do what he always does: Feed the people.
 
ThinkFoodGroup’s community kitchens are the chef and restaurateur’s latest efforts to keep the food flowing. He and the ThinkFoodGroup team are mobilizing the otherwise-dormant kitchens at Zaytinya, America Eats Tavern, Oyamel and several locations of Jaleo and using them to serve the public a rotating menu of soups, salads, entrees and more from noon to 5 p.m. daily. Andrés is doing this despite critics who say any public gathering, no matter how noble, can contribute to the spread of coronavirus.
 
“People have to eat,” Andrés said at a news preview of the community kitchens. “Not everybody is going to be able to go to the supermarket. We have areas in America that are food deserts. We have millions of Americans that, if you go to their kitchens, their kitchens are empty. Not everybody has money to fill up for a month. That’s the reality. What are we going to do?”
 
The food from these community kitchens is not free. The prices range, for example, from $6 for pork-and-hominy soup at Oyamel to $12 for a plate of hanger steak and fried potatoes at Jaleo in Crystal City. But a spokesperson for ThinkFoodGroup said anyone who can’t afford a meal will be given one free; the public can also purchase meals to be donated to others.
 
In this way, the community kitchens are a ThinkFoodGroup project —staffed with salaried employees who volunteer for the gig — but one steeped in the spirit of Andrés’s other work with World Central Kitchen, his relief nonprofit that feeds people in times of disaster, whether natural or political. World Central Kitchen’s efforts around the world — in Puerto Rico, in the Bahamas, even in Washington during the partial government shutdown — has put Andrés in a unique position to know how to serve food under trying circumstances.
“World Central Kitchen has proven, every time, that we can adapt to every circumstance, from fires to volcanoes to political situations to earthquakes to typhoons to tsunamis to places where that there is nothing left, like the Bahamas,” Andrés said.
 
Yet the coronavirus presents a different set of challenges, the chef noted. Because of the way the virus spreads, you can’t mobilize relief efforts as you would in disaster zones. You can’t have a line of 200 people making sandwiches ready to pass out to another line of hungry people, each group crowded together in a tight space. Feeding operations have to be small, targeted and operated in a way to keep both workers and the public safe. Independent restaurants are an ideal outlet for this approach, Andrés said. With a small menu and limited hours, they can be run with only a handful of people, and they can organize the line in a way to make sure there is six feet between each person in it. The signs on the ground at Zaytinya are evidence to it.
 
If the coronavirus gets worse, and parts of the country are forced to go on lockdown, restaurant operations like these could feed a city, Andrés said. “I’ve made it very clear that what I’m doing here is the blueprint for what maybe will have to happen if things get very bad,” he said.
 
The truth is, Andrés and his two primary workplaces, ThinkFoodGroup and World Central Kitchen, are preparing for the worst. World Central Kitchen is already feeding people in Arkansas and the Bronx, with plans to open sites in Washington. The nonprofit organization is even looking at large-scale operations, perhaps taking over a convention center or stadium and staffing it with chefs who pass a coronavirus test. The chefs would remain on site for a month, with no contact with the outside world, and cook for teams to distribute.
 
“We need to prepare for the worst and hope for the best,” Andrés said.
 
Make no mistake, though. Andrés thinks the worst is yet to come. During his news event, he borrowed an ominous phrase from “Game of Thrones,” one of his favorite TV series.
 
“Tell people ‘winter is coming,’ and we need to be ready for winter,” he said. “If at the end, spring shows up and winter goes away, I’m very happy. But I’m sorry, winter is coming, and what I’m trying to do is make sure that we’re ready to confront that situation.”
 
––Contributed by Tim Carman, Washington Post
We can’t travel, but we can take measures to preserve jobs in the tourism industry

We can’t travel, but we can take measures to preserve jobs in the tourism industry

We can’t travel, but we can take measures to preserve jobs in the tourism industry

Saturday, March, 21, 2020 by Caroline Freund,World Bank Blogs

We can’t travel, but we can take measures to preserve jobs in the tourism industry

Saturday, March, 21, 2020 by Caroline Freund,World Bank Blogs

The tourism industry is at a standstill. Even as policymakers around the world seek ways to mitigate the economic impact of the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic, recovery can’t begin until the health emergency is under control and travel restrictions can be lifted safely. The longer the health crisis lasts, the more difficult for companies to survive, especially the small- and medium-sized enterprises that make up a big share of the tourism ecosystem, and greater the distress for workers.

Governments are rightly worried. The latest figures from the World Travel and Tourism Council show that 50 million jobs are at risk in the sector globally , a reduction of between 12 and 14 percent. In many countries, tourism is the largest contributor to GDP, forex and employment – particularly for vulnerable groups, women and youth. For developing countries strongly dependent on tourism for gross domestic product— 20 percent for 37 countries —the health crisis is already a national economic crisis.

Early on, many unaffected destinations invested in marketing campaigns to attract those who still wished to travel. It is now clear that marketing any kind of travel – even domestic – is irresponsible.  In line with WHO guidance, we all have a responsibility to do our part to ‘flatten the curve’ and curb the transmission of the disease. This means restricting movement and reducing all forms of interaction – including travel.

The most forward-thinking industry and destination brands aim to show sensitivity and build trust – Estonia adapted their campaign on Twitter from ‘Visit Estonia’ to ‘Visit Estonia, later’ #stayhome. 

It is difficult to know when the recovery will come. But in the immediate term, governments and private companies are implementing crisis measures to protect the tourism industry as much as possible.  Where various actions can be coordinated and integrated together the recovery is likely to be quicker. Below are some interesting examples.

  • Generating alternative revenues. Destinations and industry are considering innovative ways to maintain some revenue while discouraging travel. For example, these include pay-it forward voucher schemes – for example ‘I Love Manchester Scheme’ , and ‘consume-at-home’ content like virtual tours, destination audio-guides, restaurant or hotel-branded online cooking, yoga, spa classes, and restaurant delivery services.
  • Minimizing revenue loss. Industry are waiving rebooking charges and incentivizing guests to postpone instead of cancel.
  • Planning and communication. Destination communities and associations are forming virtual emergency response groups, with objectives, including uniting on closing all attractions and monitoring and communicating with trade buyers and consumers through social media. The best communications should focus transparently on the health risks, cases, and mitigation measures, like Visit Copenhagen and Saltzburg, Austria. Joint agreement on the most important asks from government, financial sector, industry associations, and employee unions may also speed action.
  • Informing the industry. Governments and associations can prepare advice and updates on all measures being taken for the industry and/or their members – and how to access support. The National Federation of the Self-employed and Small Businesses in the United Kingdom have a comprehensive breakdown of all the assistance measures.
  • Reducing tax burden. Governments are suspending or reducing income tax payments, business rates, VAT and other fees applicable to business, including PAYE deferral and paid sick leave to provide relief to staff on reduced incomes. New Zealand announced large-scale tax relief packages, and Myanmar has waived two percent advanced income tax on exports.
  • Contamination Support. Public financial support and/or supplies to businesses to manage the costs of physically dealing with the effects of the virus, such as deep clean services, for example Singapore Cleaning Support Fund for Hotels .
  • Providing liquidity. Governments, financial institutions and other bodies are offering grants, funds or alternative capital for those most at risk (SMEs), for example see the U.S. Small Business Administration response, as well as extending lines of credit or working capital. Reducing debt Banks are extending mortgage relief and deferrals in loan repayments. Redeploying assets. Destinations are examining opportunities to re-deploy staff or tourism assets to support public health agenda, such as retraining flight attendants to support testing facilities or using hotels as health care facilities for low risk patients.

The World Bank Group is working with partners to provide reliable information and data on what to expect and what we can learn from past crisis that affected tourism  – the global financial crisis, H1N1, SARS, tsunamis, Ebola. Where we have existing tourism programs with destination clients, we will look to redirect program resources to help address the immediate crisis, and support client governments as they take measures to make tourism more resilient and ready for the recovery that will eventually come.

––Attributed from World Bank Blogs

OECD note “COVID-19: SME Policy Responses”

OECD note “COVID-19: SME Policy Responses”

OECD note “COVID-19: SME Policy Responses”

Friday, March, 20, 2020

OECD note “COVID-19: SME Policy Responses”

Friday, March, 20, 2020

 The COVID-19 outbreak has uprooted life as we know it and our public health system is working hard to combat this. We all can feel the impact on our economies and especially on SMEs that is causing us to to innovate and adapt. These changes are huge and will have long term effects that need to be tackled.

The OECD note “COVID-19: SME Policy Responses”  provides detailed information on the effects of the virus on SMEs and an overview on the first measures countries are implementing to foster SME resilience. This note gives excellent insight on these issues and may help us think about the future challenges we are going to experience as a result of this crisis! Read the full note below!

Entrepreneurship: Theory and Practice

Entrepreneurship: Theory and Practice

Entrepreneurship: Theory and Practice

Friday, March, 20, 2020

Entrepreneurship: Theory and Practice

Friday, March, 20, 2020

This new textbook by Professor Francis J. Greene provides a strong bridge between entrepreneurship theory and practice and looks at the entire life cycle of a business, including the often neglected area of business closure. Underpinned by strong academic rigor, the text takes a critical approach, yet is also highly accessible and readable, explaining complex concepts clearly and succinctly. Research-led yet practice oriented, it examines the latest evidence-based thinking in the field and applies this to the practice of entrepreneurship through a plethora of practical examples, global cases, useful tools, and engaging, multi-faceted pedagogy.

Key features:

  1. Rich pedagogy including 62 mini cases and in-chapter `academic insights’, `Entrepreneurship in Action’ practical exercises and assessment questions help students to develop their entrepreneurship mindset and their academic writing
  2. Interesting cases encompass a wide range of industries and sectors, profiling diverse brands such as Air BnB, Dropbox, Uber, Apple, Facebook, Snapchat, Subway, Microsoft, Big Heart, Gameen Bank, the Ice Hotel, Instabug, Fetchr and Jiayuan
  3. Two workbooks at the back of the book practically guide students’ start-up planning journey from an idea to a plan

 

Professor Francis J. Greene is Chair of Entrepreneurship at the University of Edinburgh Business School, Scotland. He previously worked at Durham, Warwick and Birmingham Universities and has taught in Europe, Australia and Hong Kong. He has spent over 20 years teaching practical and theoretical entrepreneurship courses.

Browse a sample chapter here (https://www.macmillanihe.com/resources/sample-chapters/9781137589552_sample.pdf)

Free inspection copies are available from the publisher – please click here (https://www.macmillanihe.com/page/detail/entrepreneurship-theory-and-practice-francis-j-greene/?sf1=barcode&st1=9781137589552)

Use our unique discount code for our ICSB members (ICSB20) on their website http://www.macmillanihe.com/ . The code offers a 20% discount and we offer free shipping as standard. The discount is valid until the end of June 2020.

We’re not going back to normal

We’re not going back to normal

We’re not Going Back to Normal

Friday, March, 20, 2020 by Gideon Lichfield

We’re not Going Back to Normal

Friday, March, 20, 2020 by Gideon Lichfield

To stop coronavirus we will need to radically change almost everything we do: how we work, exercise, socialize, shop, manage our health, educate our kids, take care of family members.

We all want things to go back to normal quickly. But what most of us have probably not yet realized—yet will soon—is that things won’t go back to normal after a few weeks, or even a few months. Some things never will.

It’s now widely agreed (even by Britain, finally) that every country needs to “flatten the curve”: impose social distancing to slow the spread of the virus so that the number of people sick at once doesn’t cause the health-care system to collapse, as it is threatening to do in Italy right now. That means the pandemic needs to last, at a low level, until either enough people have had Covid-19 to leave most immune (assuming immunity lasts for years, which we don’t know) or there’s a vaccine.

How long would that take, and how draconian do social restrictions need to be? Yesterday President Donald Trump, announcing new guidelines such as a 10-person limit on gatherings, said that “with several weeks of focused action, we can turn the corner and turn it quickly.” In China, six weeks of lockdown are beginning to ease now that new cases have fallen to a trickle.

But it won’t end there. As long as someone in the world has the virus, breakouts can and will keep recurring without stringent controls to contain them. In a report yesterday (pdf), researchers at Imperial College London proposed a way of doing this: impose more extreme social distancing measures every time admissions to intensive care units (ICUs) start to spike, and relax them each time admissions fall. Here’s how that looks in a graph.

A graph of weekly ICU cases over time.
Periodic bouts of social distancing keep the pandemic in check.

 

Imperial College Covid-19 Response Team.

The orange line is ICU admissions. Each time they rise above a threshold—say, 100 per week—the country would close all schools and most universities and adopt social distancing. When they drop below 50, those measures would be lifted, but people with symptoms or whose family members have symptoms would still be confined at home.

What counts as “social distancing”? The researchers define it as “All households reduce contact outside household, school or workplace by 75%.” That doesn’t mean you get to go out with your friends once a week instead of four times. It means everyone does everything they can to minimize social contact, and overall, the number of contacts falls by 75%.

Under this model, the researchers conclude, social distancing and school closures would need to be in force some two-thirds of the time—roughly two months on and one month off—until a vaccine is available, which will take at least 18 months (if it works at all). They note that the results are “qualitatively similar for the US.”

Eighteen months!? Surely there must be other solutions. Why not just build more ICUs and treat more people at once, for example?

Well, in the researchers’ model, that didn’t solve the problem. Without social distancing of the whole population, they found, even the best mitigation strategy—which means isolation or quarantine of the sick, the old, and those who have been exposed, plus school closures—would still lead to a surge of critically ill people eight times bigger than the US or UK system can cope with. (That’s the lowest, blue curve in the graph below; the flat red line is the current number of ICU beds.) Even if you set factories to churn out beds and ventilators and all the other facilities and supplies, you’d still need far more nurses and doctors to take care of everyone.

A graph of critical care beds occupied over time.
In all scenarios without widespread social distancing, the number of Covid cases overwhelms the healthcare system.

 

Imperial College Covid-19 Response Team

How about imposing restrictions for just one batch of five months or so? No good—once measures are lifted, the pandemic breaks out all over again, only this time it’s in winter, the worst time for overstretched health-care systems.

A graph showing critical care beds occupied over time for the suppression scenario.
If full social distancing and other measures are imposed for five months, then lifted, the pandemic comes back.

 

Imperial College Covid-19 Response Team.

And what if we decided to be brutal: set the threshold number of ICU admissions for triggering social distancing much higher, accepting that many more patients would die? Turns out it makes little difference. Even in the least restrictive of the Imperial College scenarios, we’re shut in more than half the time.

This isn’t a temporary disruption. It’s the start of a completely different way of life.

Living in a state of pandemic

In the short term, this will be hugely damaging to businesses that rely on people coming together in large numbers: restaurants, cafes, bars, nightclubs, gyms, hotels, theaters, cinemas, art galleries, shopping malls, craft fairs, museums, musicians and other performers, sporting venues (and sports teams), conference venues (and conference producers), cruise lines, airlines, public transportation, private schools, day-care centers. That’s to say nothing of the stresses on parents thrust into home-schooling their kids, people trying to care for elderly relatives without exposing them to the virus, people trapped in abusive relationships, and anyone without a financial cushion to deal with swings in income.

There’ll be some adaptation, of course: gyms could start selling home equipment and online training sessions, for example. We’ll see an explosion of new services in what’s already been dubbed the “shut-in economy.” One can also wax hopeful about the way some habits might change—less carbon-burning travel, more local supply chains, more walking and biking.

But the disruption to many, many businesses and livelihoods will be impossible to manage. And the shut-in lifestyle just isn’t sustainable for such long periods.

So how can we live in this new world? Part of the answer—hopefully—will be better health-care systems, with pandemic response units that can move quickly to identify and contain outbreaks before they start to spread, and the ability to quickly ramp up production of medical equipment, testing kits, and drugs. Those will be too late to stop Covid-19, but they’ll help with future pandemics.

In the near term, we’ll probably find awkward compromises that allow us to retain some semblance of a social life. Maybe movie theaters will take out half their seats, meetings will be held in larger rooms with spaced-out chairs, and gyms will require you to book workouts ahead of time so they don’t get crowded.

Ultimately, however, I predict that we’ll restore the ability to socialize safely by developing more sophisticated ways to identify who is a disease risk and who isn’t, and discriminating—legally—against those who are.

We can see harbingers of this in the measures some countries are taking today. Israel is going to use the cell-phone location data with which its intelligence services track terrorists to trace people who’ve been in touch with known carriers of the virus. Singapore does exhaustive contact tracing and publishes detailed data on each known case, all but identifying people by name.

We don’t know exactly what this new future looks like, of course. But one can imagine a world in which, to get on a flight, perhaps you’ll have to be signed up to a service that tracks your movements via your phone. The airline wouldn’t be able to see where you’d gone, but it would get an alert if you’d been close to known infected people or disease hot spots. There’d be similar requirements at the entrance to large venues, government buildings, or public transport hubs. There would be temperature scanners everywhere, and your workplace might demand you wear a monitor that tracks your temperature or other vital signs. Where nightclubs ask for proof of age, in future they might ask for proof of immunity—an identity card or some kind of digital verification via your phone, showing you’ve already recovered from or been vaccinated against the latest virus strains.

We’ll adapt to and accept such measures, much as we’ve adapted to increasingly stringent airport security screenings in the wake of terrorist attacks. The intrusive surveillance will be considered a small price to pay for the basic freedom to be with other people.

As usual, however, the true cost will be borne by the poorest and weakest. People with less access to health care, or who live in more disease-prone areas, will now also be more frequently shut out of places and opportunities open to everyone else. Gig workers—from drivers to plumbers to freelance yoga instructors—will see their jobs become even more precarious. Immigrants, refugees, the undocumented, and ex-convicts will face yet another obstacle to gaining a foothold in society.

Moreover, unless there are strict rules on how someone’s risk for disease is assessed, governments or companies could choose any criteria—you’re high-risk if you earn less than $50,000 a year, are in a family of more than six people, and live in certain parts of the country, for example. That creates scope for algorithmic bias and hidden discrimination, as happened last year with an algorithm used by US health insurers that turned out to inadvertently favor white people.

The world has changed many times, and it is changing again. All of us will have to adapt to a new way of living, working, and forging relationships. But as with all change, there will be some who lose more than most, and they will be the ones who have lost far too much already. The best we can hope for is that the depth of this crisis will finally force countries—the US, in particular—to fix the yawning social inequities that make large swaths of their populations so intensely vulnerable.

––contributed by MIT Technology Review

Remembering Dr. David Smallbone

Remembering Dr. David Smallbone

Remembering Dr. David Smallbone

Friday, March, 20, 2020

Remembering Dr. David Smallbone

Friday, March, 20, 2020

ICSB takes a moment to remember Dr. David Smallbone

Dr. David Smallbone, Professor of Small Business and Entrepreneurship and Associate Director of the Small Business Research Centre at Kingston University has passed. Dr. Smallbone was a Past President of both the International Council for Small Business and Entrepreneurship (ICSB) and also the ECSB. He was a fellow of the ECSB and a Wilford White Fellow of ICSB and also an Associate Editor of the Journal of Small Business Management.

Dr. Smallbone had been involved in research relating to SMEs and entrepreneurship since the late 1980s. One of his main research interests was entrepreneurship in transition economies. In 2005  he received an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Lodz in recognition of his contribution to the study of entrepreneurship in transition economies. Much of his research has been conducted in partnership with researchers in other international centers, much of it policy oriented.

In addition,  all of his research was concerned with entrepreneurship and SME development, much of it with an applied policy orientation. Entrepreneurship in transition economies was a particular specialism and that he had undertaken research throughout the central European countries that are now members of the EU; in many of the former Soviet republics; and also in China. Conceptually much of this research has been analyzed through an institutionalist frame and more recently relating to the current emphasis on context in entrepreneurial studies. Almost all of his international research has been conducted in partnership with colleagues in the countries being studied. Other research themes have included enterprise development in rural areas; ethnic minority and immigrant entrepreneurship; sources of innovation and innovation processes in SMEs; entrepreneurship and social inclusion; and internationalisation.

His legacy of research in entrepreneurship & SME studies is impactful and deeply inspiring. An example of values demonstrated in research by selection, excellence, care and critical thinking. He passed away yesterday, March 19th. He was a gentleman, a visionary, a huge Arsenal fan and a very dear friend to many. He moved the field forward and ICSB will be forever grateful. Our thoughts are with his family at this difficult time.

ICSB Response to COVID-19 Crisis

ICSB Response to COVID-19 Crisis

ICSB Response to COVID-19 Crisis

Thursday, March, 19, 2020

ICSB Response to COVID-19 Crisis

Thursday, March, 19, 2020

ICSB Exchange Inaugural Webinar Session

Global Knowledge Sharing by Members to Members.

This ICSB Exchange session discussed ICSB’s response to the Covid-19 crisis. Our members were updated on the status of the ICSB World Congress in Paris and our new initiatives in online education support, engaging with our global partners, and the current ICSB journals.

The session panelists included ICSB President Mr. Ahmed Osman, and ICSB President-Elect Dr. Winslow Sargeant. The session was moderated by Dr. Ayman El Tarabishy, ICSB Executive Director and Deputy Chair of Department of Management at The George Washington University.

Watch the video below!

Latest ICSB updates on 2020 World Congress and other events

Latest ICSB updates on 2020 World Congress and other events

Latest ICSB updates on 2020 World Congress and other events

Wednesday, March 18, 2020

Latest ICSB updates on 2020 World Congress and other events

Wednesday, March 18, 2020

Dear ICSB Family, 

Many of you have inquired about the status of the ICSB2020 Congress in Paris. While we monitor the situation, we encourage you to continue submitting paper and session proposals. We hope to have a final decision by April 30, 2020.

As entrepreneurship faculty, policymakers, and practitioners, we know the value of collaboration and sharing knowledge.  Traditionally this occurred through various meetings, certificate programs, and conferences. These are excellent opportunities to build our vibrant network.

But the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic is presenting challenges; some would even say chaos on a number of levels including, to name a few,  health concerns, travel restrictions, and conference postponements and cancellations. 

ICSB’s main focus is the health and safety of our members, who comprise a truly global network. Each day, new policies and information are being implemented to help prevent the spread of the virus. ICSB will be monitoring the situation and working with our global partners to determine the best course of action. We hope to have a final decision made by April 30, 2020. 

In the meantime, we encourage you to continue submitting your papers until April 30, 2020. Additionally, consider supporting the small businesses in your area who are facing extreme economic uncertainty. One way is by purchasing gift cards to your favorite restaurants and using them at a later date. (https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/2020/03/13/small-business-impact-coronavirus/)

If you’d like to share your story (in a few sentences), please complete this form. We will collect responses and share them with the ICSB Family at the end of each week (CLICK HERE). 

If you have any questions or concerns, we are here to help. 

Sincerely,

Ahmed Osman
President of ICSB