In Disruptive Times, The Power Comes From People: An interview with Eric Schmidt

In Disruptive Times, The Power Comes From People: An interview with Eric Schmidt

In Disruptive Times, The Power Comes From People: An interview with Eric Schmidt

Thursday, March, 5, 2020

In Disruptive Times, The Power Comes From People: An interview with Eric Schmidt

Thursday, March, 5, 2020

As we enter a new golden age of technological innovation, nurturing talent will become more critical, according to the former chairman of Alphabet.

With his decades of experience in Silicon Valley, Eric Schmidt is regularly tapped for his views on the future of technology and how the latest disruptive innovations in areas such as artificial intelligence could shape the world. Yet he’s quick to point out that it’s the people behind the technology who make the difference, a sentiment he admits is oft repeated yet still somehow underestimated. Developing young talent into the inventors and leaders of tomorrow is a major focus of Schmidt’s philanthropic efforts—and Rise, a new joint initiative between Schmidt Futures and the Rhodes Trust, embodies that mission.

At the recent McKinsey BLINK Conference in the United Kingdom, Schmidt spoke about the dizzying speed of disruption, as well as how to nurture and position people to harness technological dynamism for the greater good of organizations and society. An edited version of his remarks follows.

Talent: Where incredible meets profound

We’re at the beginning of another golden age. When I think about the next big tech innovations, I like to distinguish between those that are incredible and those that are profound. Self-driving cars could be incredible. They can potentially save hundreds of thousands of lives. But new technologies that allow a paradigm shift in the way we solve problems would be profound. Many of today’s toughest problems exist because we are at the limit of what we can understand.

In synthetic biology, for example, we’re only just beginning to understand how to make the changes that are necessary to stop and start biological processes that are beneficial to humans, animals, and plants. That field is about to explode.

When it comes to climate change, batteries look like they might be part of the answer, in combination with solar and wind. Developing longer-lasting organic batteries, however, requires a better understanding of their material properties.

Wouldn’t you like to have a drug that would cure whatever disease you have? The easiest way to achieve that is with drugs that figure out how to build the correct protein in your body to stop a virus from replicating.

All this progress is underway, thanks largely to techniques in machine learning, artificial intelligence, and generative design. Collectively, these technologies will allow the discovery of new solutions to important problems at a rate we’ve never seen before.

But when I think about how we’re going to solve the problems ahead of us, the answer is people. We need to acknowledge how powerful people are, particularly those who are willing to take risks and drive societal change. Exceptional people are the ones who change society. They’re just born different and are insanely capable—and they’re rare. Yet they don’t show up just in the elite organizations or the cities of the world. People confuse elite with exceptional; the elite are self-proclaimed, while the exceptional are identified. Thanks to the internet and the fact that about half the people in the world have a smartphone, we can reach these people in a way we couldn’t before.

Competition: Will people win over data?

Disruption is not going to slow down. If you entered a market last week, you have disproportionally greater economic gains than if you entered this week. One of the rules in my world is that it’s hard to catch up, and even harder to get ahead, once you fall behind. Time and again today, we see industries that were relatively static that are now drastically changed by digitization and the reimagining of their products. Winning companies are building software platforms, they’re interacting with customers online. There’s a proliferation of innovation and new design techniques, which some industries have been slow to take advantage of, that either a traditional company or new entrant can utilize to seize the moment and reimagine products or entire industries. You see finance being reimagined, even fashion. In the next ten years, we will likely see this happen to most everything companies do.

But, again, people are the answer. If you care about winning, you want to make sure you provide them with the right coaching and structure and ensure plenty of diversity. Throughout my entire career, I’ve always had the opportunity to work with people exceptionally smarter than I and to help them be successful. We are producing a new generation that’s going to be smarter than previous ones, because its members are growing up in a more sophisticated, digitally native, and intense world. Part of a leader’s job is to be a magnet for such people and to get them to be the best that they can be. Four in ten people in the world are under 25 years old. This next generation is going to change the demographics of the workplace in a profound way. They have enormous energy but lack business experience. Business leaders should embrace being educators and mentors for these people as part of their everyday role. It’s both good for business and personally satisfying. When I look back, people development is probably one of the things I’m most proud of.

There are also studies about innovation that indicate that diversity is critical for driving innovation. With a blend of different points of view, you’re much more likely to get the kind of innovation that pushes things forward. So not only is it morally good to support diversity but it’s also good for your business. The supply of diversity is getting better, even though the pace of change has been frustratingly slower than any of us thought it would be. The proportion of women in computer-science programs historically has been in the area of 18 percent but is set to increase. There are similar gains expected among underrepresented minorities, although at a much lower level.

“New technologies that allow a paradigm shift in the way we solve problems would be profound. Many of today’s toughest problems exist because we are at the limit of what we can understand.”

With the right people, both large and smaller businesses can continue to thrive. There’s an argument I hear all the time: that, in the future, only large companies will exist, because they have access to the most data, and he or she who has all the data has control. While it’s true that centralization in certain situations has provided economic power, it’s much more likely that there are new sources of power. Consider, for example, the power of an online minority to spread misinformation, to make something seem more important.

Further to this point, in artificial intelligence and machine learning, there’s a great deal of research on how to build algorithms using much less data than is currently required. This notion that he or she who has the most data wins is ultimately going to be a temporal phenomenon. I think what we’ll discover is that he or she who has the smartest engineers developing the smartest algorithms is the one who will win.

About the author(s)

Eric Schmidt is the cofounder of Schmidt Futures, chairman of the National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence, and former chairman of Alphabet. His commentary here was adapted from his opening remarks and fireside chat with Kevin Sneader, global managing partner of McKinsey & Company, at the McKinsey BLINK Conference on digital and social disruption, which took place in London in November 2019.

Published by McKinsey Digital

Social Enterprises Help Out with Corona Virus Crisis Across Asia

Social Enterprises Help Out with Corona Virus Crisis Across Asia

Social Enterprises Help Out with Corona Virus Crisis Across Asia

Thursday, March, 5, 2020

Social Enterprises Help Out with Corona Virus Crisis Across Asia

Thursday, March, 5, 2020

From handing out salvaged soap to street cleaners, to AI technology for teaching school children quarantined at home, it’s all good

by Marianne Bray and Beh Lih Yi, BusinessDay

Hong Kong/Kuala Lumpur — Handing out soap to street cleaners in Hong Kong might sound like piecemeal work in the battle against coronavirus. But with schools and offices shut in the Chinese-ruled city and across Asia, social enterprises — businesses that seek to do good while making a profit — are rushing to tackle problems from a shortage of face masks to distance learning.

Among them is Soap Cycling, which distributes soap salvaged from Hong Kong hotels to street cleaners to try to maintain public hygiene and stop the virus spreading.

“During a crisis such as the coronavirus situation, people who are already struggling are hit hardest first,” Justen Li, chair of the enterprise set up in 2012, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation by phone.

The virus has killed more than 2,800 people and is spreading faster outside China than within, hitting major industries from manufacturing to travel.

With flights being cancelled and factories, restaurants and schools closed in many Asian cities, social enterprises have swung into action.

Hong Kong’s street cleaners, vulnerable to contagion and often seen pushing metal carts through the skyscraper city, approached Li’s staff when they were handing out soap to city-goers in February.

Face mask shortage

“They began asking us for masks,” he said. “The government provides them with masks but they are sweated through in an hour or two. Once they are sweaty, they are not helpful anymore.”

After teaming up with a local partner and activating a network of volunteers, Soap Cycling now provide hygiene kits and masks to about 3,000 of the city’s 21,000 street cleaners.

Other businesses for good are tackling education.

This week, Hong Kong prolonged its suspension of schools until April but with an artificial intelligence )AI) learning platform that can be accessed from tablets or phones at home, more than 12,000 students in China, Hong Kong and Vietnam are continuing to learn.

“When serious disruption occurs, from natural disasters to outbreaks of disease, education has traditionally suffered drastically,” said Priya Lakhani, founder of London-based Century Tech, which offered its product for free to affected students.

Students learn subjects such as maths and science through lessons that are tailored to their levels using AI technology on the platform developed by the social enterprise.

Other social entrepreneurs have sought to address the widespread shortage of face masks.

‘Unsung heroes’

Hong Kong’s Sew On Studio sells face mask kits with fabric made by elderly tailors that residents can assemble themselves at home.

Another Hong Kong firm, Rooftop Republic, which, in normal times, promotes urban farming, has teamed up with a uniform supplier to design washable, eco-friendly masks that workers can slip over surgical masks to wear in humid conditions.

Many respiratory infections, including the Covid-19, are spread in droplets that are released when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

In Singapore, which has seen one of the highest numbers of coronavirus cases outside China, one social enterprise simply encourages people to thank taxi drivers and domestic helpers, who they depend on in their daily lives, via e-cards. A token gesture perhaps but the founder of Emmaus Strategies — which runs programmes on mental well-being — said it is important to pay tribute to these “unsung heroes”.

“There is a lot of social distancing in place and cities are under lockdown to try to curb the spread of the coronavirus,” said James Lim. “But we still can reach people through electronic means to say thank you.” 

CALL FOR INSIGHTS: SME Finance Outlook 2030

CALL FOR INSIGHTS: SME Finance Outlook 2030

CALL FOR INSIGHTS: SME Finance Outlook 2030

Thursday, March, 5, 2020

CALL FOR INSIGHTS: SME Finance Outlook 2030

Thursday, March, 5, 2020

Global SME Finance Forum 2020 – Call for Insights

To celebrate the new decade, this year’s Global SME Finance Forum will look much farther forward, to imagine where we might be in SME financing a decade from now. We will test the limits of our prescience by predicting how products, delivery channels, institutions and enabling environments that will have evolved.
 
Following our practice of leveraging as much knowledge sharing as we can from our membership and our wider public audience, we will launch a public “Call for Insights” on what SME finance will look like in 2030. Best articles will be shared in a special report to be issued at the conference, and the authors will be recognized at the event.
Share your unique vision on what SME finance will look in 2030 by sending your essay to the SME Finance Forum.
 
Deadline: March 31
 
 
Entrepreneurship in Crisis

Entrepreneurship in Crisis

Entrepreneurship in Crisis

Wednesday, March 4, 2020

Entrepreneurship in Crisis

Wednesday, March 4, 2020

It’s hard to believe that something so small that it can only be seen through a microscope can bring the world to a standstill. The novel coronavirus COVID-19 has already made its mark in China, Italy, and Iran and continues its sweeping development throughout the world. Rapidly, solutions are being proposed and tested, with all of society engaged in searching for a way to stem the tide.

Though COVID-19 is a human-oriented problem at its core—it has affected the health and well-being of tens of thousands of people—so much more is involved. Like a small pebble dropped in a pond, the ripple effects of one problem can cause waves on every shore it reaches. One of those areas that the ripples have reached is businesses, particularly small and medium-sized businesses.

People are at the heart of businesses; they make their own businesses thrive through hard work, and they make other businesses thrive through consumerism. If people cannot work due to poor health, fear of catching or spreading the illness, or quarantines, the business they own or work for suffers. When they cannot work, people have less or no disposable income to buy, causing other businesses to suffer loss. Many entrepreneurs are scrambling to salvage their businesses that are caught in this vicious cycle.

Yet, we see some key areas where entrepreneurship can actually take the reins, leading in this time of crisis and showing more than just the resilience to come back, they need to show the innovative strength to forge forward. Entrepreneurship depends on innovation, and innovation at its core is about seeing a need and filling it, about coming up with solutions, about finding new ways to do things. These solutions, these new ways will not only help businesses survive; they will help them thrive and possibly even open up whole new opportunities by being first movers. Innovation can be the fire and the spark that ignites the flames of progress, even in times of crisis. 

But as humanity is in a current crisis, it’s humanity, that humane culture, and ideology, that is needed more than ever within businesses. A “people” problem must be addressed, showing care and concern through humane business practices about the very people who may be suffering as much as anyone else. A worldwide health crisis levels the playing field as microbes have no bias or concern about who they infect, and entrepreneurial owners and managers do well when they apply the golden rule of treating others how they would like to be treated.

The concept of human entrepreneurship holds the belief that innovation and the financial prosperity of a business goes hand in hand with the humane treatment of those who are the heart and soul of the business—its employees. This is the recipe that can help entrepreneurship, not just weather the storm but come out standing. 

There’s a common saying that people like to use during hardships like we face today: “You never let a serious crisis go to waste.”

With the widening of the Coronavirus, the epidemic has increasingly mounted pressure on the global supply chain, abruptly driven deep dips in the stock market, and gradually infected the working population. As the Coronavirus strikes fear in the public and introduces more uncertainty to business, it has left business professionals, the global market, and the rest of the world paralyzed.

However, through the gravity of the situation, a good entrepreneur knows not to let a serious crisis go to waste. Now, at face value this sounds exploitative; however, the underlying insight is wise. The lesson here is not to suggest entrepreneurs seek to profit from others’ misfortune, but rather to realize the new opportunities to innovate in ways they could not before.

Innovation and invention is the mother of necessity. Even though it may be dire, there is still an opportunity to be forward-looking. The world is forever in need of entrepreneurs who can observe the immediate needs of society whilst look beyond the public’s field of vision. From the invention of the blood transfusion in 1913 to the invention of the vaccine in 1955, to the invention of robotic surgery in the year 2000, the world cries out again, in 2020, for strong innovation backed by humane entrepreneurial practice.

article written by:
Dr. Ayman ElTarabishy
Deputy Chair, Department of Management
The George Washington University
ICSB Executive Director

Launch of the GEM 2020 Global Report

Launch of the GEM 2020 Global Report

Launch of the GEM 2020 Global Report

Tuesday, March 3, 2020

Launch of the GEM 2020 Global Report

Tuesday, March 3, 2020

ICSB warmly congratulates and is proud to announce the launch of the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) 2020 Global Report.

 

GEM has been keeping its finger on the pulse of the state of entrepreneurship since 1999, both in terms of the state of the entrepreneurial mindset, motivations, activities, and ambition, and the national framework conditions required to allow entrepreneurship to flourish in an economy. In this, GEM’s “coming of age” 21st year, entrepreneurship is in the spotlight as never before, with multiple governments increasingly focused on putting into place policy frameworks and mechanisms to drive and promote entrepreneurship.

Fifty economies participated in the GEM 2019 Adult Population Survey (APS), including 11 from the Middle East & Africa, eight from Asia & Pacific, eight from Latin America & Caribbean, and 23 from Europe & North America. Five of these economies are classified as low-income level, 12 as middle-income and the rest as high-income. Over 150,000 individuals participated in extended interviews as part of the GEM research in 2019. This is the solid evidence base for the GEM findings that are presented in this report.

An ICSB delegation led by Drs. Alex DeNoble, Jeffrey Alves, and Ayman El Tarabishy attended the launch of the GEM Global Report launch.

We are also looking forward to seeing GEM teams at ICSB World Congress in Paris, July 7-10, 2020. 

Download the full GEM 2020 Global Report here

Remembering Geert Hofstede

Remembering Geert Hofstede

Remembering Geert Hofstede

Tuesday, March, 3, 2020

Remembering Geert Hofstede

Tuesday, March, 3, 2020

ICSB takes a moment to remember Geert Hofstede

In Memoriam Geert Hofstede (1928-2020)

It is with great sadness that we learned of the passing of Geert Hofstede, professor emeritus of Organizational Anthropology and International Management. Geert reached the blessed age of 91. This world-renowned cultural scholar is survived by his wife Maaike, his four children, ten grandchildren and five greatgrandchildren. According to his oldest son Gert Jan, with whom Geert co-authored major work and who will go on carry the torch, his father was ‘ready to go’.

From 1985 until his retirement in 1993, Geert was a member of the School of Business and Economics. He was invited to come to Maastricht after his rapidly growing scientific reputation in the wake of the publication of his magnum opus, Culture’s Consequences (1980). Geert conducted this study, which was refused by no fewer than sixteen publishers until Sage courageously decided to publish it, as manager of personnel research with the American multinational IBM. Based on a survey of 117,000 questionnaires, responded to by IBM-employees in 50 different countries and three country-regions, Geert arrived at surprising findings. The replies to all sorts of work-related questions differed not so much according to the position, department, age or gender of the respondents, but in relation to their nationality. From his inexhaustible source of data, Geert distilled four national cultural dimensions: Individualism versus Collectivism, Power distance, Uncertainty avoidance and Masculinity versus Femininity. Later he added Long-term orientation versus Short-term orientation and Indulgence versus Restraint. This tool served as basis for many studies of the impact of national cultural differences on all sorts of organizational aspects: strategy, marketing, HRM, and even accounting and financing. Importantly, this model put the cultural values of individual managers and staff centre-stage. Hofstede’s work has often been applied in businesses and in consultancy as well.

Geert was invited to work at the UM also to set up the curriculum of International Management (IM). Later on, this field developed into the highly successful field of International Business, but Geert must be credited for having laid the groundwork. As this effort proved to be demanding at times, Geert left Maastricht with mixed feelings. Fortunately, all was straightened out later on, and he would still give several memorable workshops and guest lectures for an enthusiastic audience of students and staff from various faculties, both from within and outside of the UM.

In its obituary, NRC Handelsblad called Hofstede ‘the free-ranging professor who wrote a pioneering standard work’. Geert himself coined this notion of ‘free-ranging professor’ for his approach. He saw himself preferably as a scholar active in between the established academic disciplines. He is well characterized indeed as a generalist – as one who builds bridges between fields such as psychology, anthropology and business management. Both the UM and its School of Business and Economics are much indebted to Geert. We wish those dear to him all the strength to cope with their great loss, and we are convinced that his academic legacy will continue to produce fruitful results.

The life and work of Geert Hofstede will be commemorated during a mini symposium, to be held on March 20, from 14:00 to 16:00, in the SBE Auditorium at Tongersestraat 53. It is possible to sign up for this event through the following link

 
Register for Open Webinar  Digital Banking Solutions Series on Automation – Part II

Register for Open Webinar Digital Banking Solutions Series on Automation – Part II

Register for Open Webinar Digital Banking Solutions Series on Automation – Part II

Tuesday, March, 3, 2020

Register for Open Webinar Digital Banking Solutions Series on Automation – Part II

Tuesday, March, 3, 2020

When: Wednesday, March 25, 2020
Time: 8:00 a.m. – 9:15 a.m. EST
REGISTER HERE

The SME Finance Forum is hosting a two-session webinar series on Digital Banking Solutions, the first was on platforms and the second will be on automation. 
 
Part Two: Automation
With rapid digitalization in the financial services ecosystem, banks are embracing automation and other innovations to improve SME lending processes. By using data, AI, and machine learning, banks are integrating paperless online applications and single platforms to process loan application, eliminating paperwork, and the slow and expensive processes to make lending decisions. These technologies enhance, not eliminate the role of loan officers and manual underwriters, and aggregate data for verification, analyze and monitor financial statements, allowing for quicker and in some cases, nearly instantaneous lending decisions.
 
In this webinar, open to SME Finance Forum members and non-members, you will hear from two SME lenders who are embracing these technologies. First, we will hear from the SME Credit Risk Strategy Team at member Garanti BBVA, who will discuss their credit automation pilot that they launched in 2018. We will also hear from OakNorth, a multi-billion-dollar digital bank focused on redefining lending to small and medium-sized businesses globally using its next-generation credit platform.
 
What you will learn
– How to utilize technologies to reduce manual processes
– How to decrease time for lending decisions
– How to improve loan monitoring
 
About the speakers
 
Sean Hunter is the Chief Information Officer at OakNorth, a multi-billion-dollar fintech firm focused on redefining lending to small and medium-sized businesses globally using its next-generation credit platform. Prior to joining OakNorth, Sean was one of the first commercial engineers at Palantir Technologies in Europe where he led trader oversight partnerships with large financial institutions, particularly Credit Suisse, which led to being co-head of the JV called Signac. Before Palantir, Sean was a strategist at Goldman Sachs for 8 years, working in a number of areas including equities, fixed income, and algorithmic trading.
 
Alper Eker is the Head of Retail Credit Risk at Garanti BBVA. He has with 20+ years of experience and background in process automation and corporate risk management in international corporations like General Electric and universal banks like BBVA and Garanti BBVA bank, started his career in GE Corporate R&D Center in NY, USA, as a technology expert, led different technology development projects in GE power systems, healthcare, and GE Capital. Since 2016, leading Retail Credit risk area for Consumer and SME loans in Garanti bank, responsible from wing to wing management of Underwriting to Monitoring areas for unsecured products i.e. personal loans, overdrafts, credit cards, as well as secured products such as Mortgage and Auto loans. In his role, Alper Eker has focused on optimized workflows and digitalization of credit circuits, lately in SME retail microcredit. Alper Eker, holds a Ph.D. degree in System Controls and Process Optimization from the University of Houston Chemical Engineering Department.
Read more about this webinar here
Contact: Jessica Alfaro |  jalfaro2@ifc.org
 
Register below to join the online meeting from your computer. Prior registration is required to attend the webinar. Enter meeting number 731 217 597 if registration form is not displayed.

SME Finance Forum
- Accelerating finance for business -
 
ICSB & Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM)  Team-up for High Impact Research Papers and Workshops at ICSB World Congress 2020 in Paris!

ICSB & Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) Team-up for High Impact Research Papers and Workshops at ICSB World Congress 2020 in Paris!

ICSB & Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) Team-up for High Impact Research Papers and Workshops at ICSB World Congress 2020 in Paris!

Tuesday, March, 3, 2020

ICSB & Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) Team-up for High Impact Research Papers and Workshops at ICSB World Congress 2020 in Paris!

Tuesday, March, 3, 2020

About Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM)

GEM is a consortium of national country teams, primarily associated with top academic institutions, that carries out survey-based research on entrepreneurship around the world. GEM is the only global research source that collects data on entrepreneurship directly from individual entrepreneurs! (read more

GEM Papers and Workshops – Invitation to Submit

ICSB’s 2020 World Congress in Paris invites GEM teams to submit GEM research papers and workshops though a dedicated track (called GEM) in the ICSB Submission System. The Track Chair for GEM will be Ms. Aileen Ionescu-Somers.

Aileen Ionescu-Somers, GEM Executive Director 

As GEM’s Executive Director since February 2019, Aileen’s main objective is to ensure that GEM is increasingly perceived as the world-class reference for data-driven entrepreneurship knowledge and expertise worldwide. Aileen is a highly experienced academic researcher/teacher and an author of books, case studies, and journal/newspaper articles.

Before GEM, she spent three years as Associate Dean of Business School Lausanne, working on embedding entrepreneurship and sustainability in research, undergraduate, executive and doctoral programs. For 15 years, she was Director of a membership-driven research platform at IMD, a top-ranked business school based in Switzerland. There, she directed collaborative corporate sustainability research projects involving some 60 global companies and ran multi-stakeholder thought leadership events. Prior to IMD, Aileen spent 13 years in program management at WWF, heading program operations for Latin America and Africa and ultimately, globally

PAPER & WORKSHOP SUBMISSIONS DUE ON: MARCH 22, 2020
ICSB invites everyone to the ICSB World Congress in Paris, France to showcase their creative ideas, inventions, inspirations, and achievements in Entrepreneurship and support to SMEs.
 
ICSB & ISBE Team-up for High Impact Research Papers and Workshops at ICSB World Congress 2020 in Paris!

ICSB & ISBE Team-up for High Impact Research Papers and Workshops at ICSB World Congress 2020 in Paris!

ICSB & ISBE Team-up for High Impact Research Papers and Workshops at ICSB World Congress 2020 in Paris!

Tuesday, March, 3, 2020

ICSB & ISBE Team-up for High Impact Research Papers and Workshops at ICSB World Congress 2020 in Paris!

Tuesday, March, 3, 2020

About the Institute for Small Business and Entrepreneurship

The Institute for Small Business and Entrepreneurship (ISBE) enables excellence in small business across research, policy, practice and learning communities. ISBE seeks to connect its membership and communities to pursue excellence in the field of small business and entrepreneurship.

Founded in the mid-1970s, following the publication of the 1971 Bolton Report, informal meetings led to the founding of the Institute in the late ’80s. Now over 4000 members strong, ISBE has a rich history of responsive debate on small business and entrepreneurship through its events, policy think-tanks, and publications. For more information, click here.

ISBE Papers and Workshops

ICSB’s 2020 World Congress in Paris invites ISBE scholars to submit research papers and workshops through a dedicated track (called ‘ISBE’) in the ICSB Submission System. The submission deadline is March 22. The Track Co-Chairs for ISBE will be Dr. Kiran Trehan.

Dr. Kiran Trehan, ISBE President

As President for ISBE, Kiran’s main objective is to advance an impactful agenda which has a real influence on policy and reflects the growth and ISBE’s vision of enabling excellence in entrepreneurship and small business research.

Kiran Trehan is Pro-Vice Chancellor for Partnerships and Engagement, Professor of Entrepreneurship and Director of the Centre for Women’s Enterprise, Leadership, Economy & Diversity at The University of York. Professor Trehan is a key contributor to debates on leadership, enterprise development, and diversity in small firms and businesses. She has led a number of leadership, enterprise, and business support initiatives and has extensively published in journals, policy reports, books and book chapters. Her work has been supported by grants from a full range of research funding bodies; including the Economic and Social Research Councils and Arts Humanities Research councils, government departments, regional and local agencies including Local Enterprise Partnerships and Chambers of Commerce and the private sector. Professor Trehan has held national and international advisory roles that shape debates and policy in diversity and enterprise and is a Visiting Professor at the University of Birmingham.

Dr. Simon Raby, ISBE International Representative

As ISBE’s International Representative, Simon’s main objective is to encourage international collaboration between ISBE and like-minded scholars and organizations that raise the profile of research in small business and entrepreneurship. Dr. Raby moved to Canada in 2015 to conduct a program of research on the growth of Alberta’s Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs) to understand the drivers of growth, innovation, and diversification for these firms. This research has since led to the creation of “The Leader’s Growth Mindset”.

Simon is a Professor of Innovation and Entrepreneurship at Mount Royal University’s Bissett School of Business (Calgary, Canada), Associate Director for the University’s Institute for Innovation and Entrepreneurship and Director for the Growth Compass. The Growth Compass is focused on delivering evidence-based insights on business growth and scaling. Simon’s research program seeks to uncover the strategies, practices, and methods of support that enable business growth, leadership transitions and people performance in small firm contexts. Simon is an experienced educator, scholar, and practitioner, and author of books, case studies, and journal/newspaper articles, and has experience in growth strategy and innovation consulting.

PAPER & WORKSHOP SUBMISSIONS DUE ON: MARCH 22, 2020
ICSB invites everyone to the ICSB World Congress in Paris, France to showcase their creative ideas, inventions, inspirations, and achievements in Entrepreneurship and support to SMEs.
Pioneering Research on Job Creation and Destruction Awarded 100,000 Euros

Pioneering Research on Job Creation and Destruction Awarded 100,000 Euros

Pioneering Research on Job Creation and Destruction Awarded 100,000 Euros

Monday, March, 2, 2020

Pioneering Research on Job Creation and Destruction Awarded 100,000 Euros

Monday, March, 2, 2020

The 2020 Global Award for Entrepreneurship Research goes to John Haltiwanger, Professor of Economics at University of Maryland, USA

Haltiwanger is awarded for his pioneering research advancing our understanding of job creation and destruction, productivity growth, and the role of small business and entrepreneurial firms in economic development. The Global Award is the foremost international award in entrepreneurship research with a prize sum of € 100,000.

Professor John Haltiwanger has made significant contributions to the field of entrepreneurship by improving our understanding of job creation and destruction, productivity growth, and the role of small and medium-sized firms (SMEs) in economic development. He has played a major role in the careful development of large, longitudinal firm-level datasets, and introduced a novel and widely adopted measure of firm growth that addresses previous statistical biases. His work has influenced public policy and national statistical offices around the world.

Professor Haltiwanger’s most important contributions include:
• To question the conventional wisdom of the job creation ability of small business. He provides evidence that large and mature firms account for most of the newly created manufacturing jobs, and that these jobs are of higher quality than those in SMEs in that they are more likely to persist in subsequent years.
• To show the importance of firm age as opposed to size: the job creation in small firms takes place in the first few years of their existence, as captured in the “up-or-out” dynamics.
• The decomposition of productivity growth into contributions from continuing, entering, and exiting firms. He shows that the largest component of growth can be attributed to continuing firms improving their productivity over time.

The Award ceremony will take place in Stockholm on May 11. For further information, please visit our website, www.e-award.org.

The Global Award for Entrepreneurship Research is the foremost global award for research on entrepreneurship. The Award honors significant contributions to theory-building on entrepreneurship and small business development. The Award consists of the statuette ”The Hand of God” by the Swedish sculptor Carl Milles and a prize amount of 100 000 Euros.

Founder of the Award: Swedish Entrepreneurship Forum. Co-founder: The Research Institute of Industrial Economics (IFN). Sponsor: Vinnova – Sweden´s Innovation Agency. Donor: Lars Backsell.