A Tribute to Professor David Smallbone

A Tribute to Professor David Smallbone

A Tribute to Professor David Smallbone

Thursday, April 9, 2020

A Tribute to Professor David Smallbone

Thursday, April 9, 2020

A Tribute to Professor David Smallbone

Obituary; Professor David Smallbone

We are sad to announce that Professor David Smallbone passed away recently. He had a distinguished career in the field of entrepreneurship and small firms. David was an engaging and driven individual who marked his career with a number of significant achievements in his life journey and built up an inestimable portfolio of work throughout his career. David’s entry into academia was quite unconventional. Originally a geography school teacher, he entered higher education in the mid-1970s as a tutor for the Open University and lecturer at Middlesex Polytechnic, with a research interest in small firms in local and regional economic development.  David founded the Centre for Enterprise and Economic Development at Middlesex University (then Middlesex Polytechnic) with David North, and built up a strong reputation for research and consultancy, particularly in relation to policy intervention. It was during this time, that we both met David, as he received a grant as part of the ESRC’s Small Firms Initiative co-ordinated by David Storey, for a longitudinal study of small manufacturing firms examining survivors and non-survivors.  Such studies are rare in the research field and it is regarded as novel even by today’s standards.  In 2004, David moved to the Small Business Research Centre, Kingston University, adding significant weight to an already influential research team, providing the opportunity for him to accelerate his research activity and influence.

David’s expertise spanned a range of areas including business growth, innovation, ethnic minority enterprise, transition and developing economies but he was particularly interested in public policy.  He worked with a variety of academics, practitioners and policy makers, initially in the UK and then globally and in partnership with institutions across all continents, as David built up a brilliant network of colleagues and friends. He was for example, a team member of several OECD delegations which produced country reports on SMEs and SME policy for Poland 2010, Mexico 2013 and Italy 2014. These involved lengthy visits and interactions with national, regional and local policy makers as well as financial institutions and SMEs. He undertook research in the former Soviet Republics and transition economies from the early 1990s, at a time when it was neither fashionable or easy to pursue. This did not deter David. He built up long-lasting international relations with partners, for example, in Russia, Poland, Estonia, the Baltic States, China, Kenya, South Africa, the USA and Australasia. David also promulgated and managed a number of large-scale European projects, particularly with partners through the European Network for Social and Economic Research, most recently for the European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions leading an international team who analysed born-global manufacturing SMEs, employing an unusual research design that traced partners in global value chains and the role of SMEs.

David was very much a people-person and relished engaging with others, irrespective of position.  With colleagues, David regularly presented papers at ISBE’s (formerly ISBA and UKEMRA) annual research and policy conferences and contributed to the growth of the organisation through his executive positions, chairing of workshops, committees and doctoral workshops. From the mid-1990s his energy was then transferred to the European and international stage, collaborating with colleagues in their home countries. Hence, David helped to shape many careers, too numerous to mention by name but suffice to say that without his advice, counsel and drive to co-publish, many academics may have taken a different career path. He mentored younger researchers on local and international projects as well as undertook formal duties supervising and examining doctorates, thus influencing and encouraging many academics who have become today’s leading researchers.

As well as his myriad publications, David’s recognition and expertise is reflected in his numerous awards and honours. He was Visiting Professor of Entrepreneurship at the China University of Geosciences in Wuhan, Associate Editor of the Journal of Small Business Management, member of the Editorial Board of the International Small Business Journal, President (2005-07) and Fellow of the European Council for Small Firms and Entrepreneurship, President of the International Council for Small Business and Entrepreneurship (2010-11) and Wilfred White Fellow of ICSB. David was an accomplished traveller, reaching the four corners of the world, for example in 2008, spending three months at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand, as a Visiting Erskine Scholar. In 2005 David was proud to receive an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Lodz, in recognition of his contribution to the study of entrepreneurship in transition economies.  David’s travelling would have exhausted even the fittest individual but his zest for life and intellectual curiosity continued to take him overseas, most recently to Brazil in 2019 and India, for a Global Challenges Research Fund project, just a few weeks before he died.

Those who have had the privilege to work with David, as we both have, will have been touched by his dedication and passion on his subject, always tinged with a sense of humour and humanity. According to one friend, as President of ICSB David was never very outspoken but when he did speak everyone would listen, even the Americans! David was a keen Arsenal fan, holding a season ticket and pointed out that one of the advantages of having a mobility problem was that his seat was ‘close the action’. His birthday parties at his home in St Albans are now legendary, with a traditional jazz band providing entertainment and where on occasion David managed a dance with his wife. Most recently, David’s ill-health was beginning to hamper his mobility but his indefatigable spirit led him to continue to work and with support from his wife and family, his helper and close colleagues, he took on new projects and produced numerous research outputs adding to his extensive life’s work.  He insisted on going into the office to meet staff and students right to the end. Resolutely cheerful, never complaining and always planning the next project. Even at the end, David was working on an edited book with colleagues across the globe. It was this display of courage, tenacity and dedication that brought an incredible display of respect amongst his peers; over a hundred sending in messages of condolences on hearing of his passing. David will be dearly missed by the academic community and policy makers across the globe.  He leaves behind his loving wife, Margaret and family.

David John Smallbone 13th, 1946 – 19th March 2020

Robert Blackburn and David Storey

World Business Report: 25% of US small businesses could close

World Business Report: 25% of US small businesses could close

World Business Report: 25% of US small businesses could close

Tuesday April, 7, 2020 by BBC World Report

World Business Report: 25% of US small businesses could close

Tuesday April, 7, 2020 by BBC World Report

Blind Optimism for the Unforeseeable Future

The BBC World Business Report released a broadcast that described a wide array of perspectives on the financial and social consequences of COVID-19. After interviewing Neil Bradley, we understand that about one in ten businesses are less than a month away from shutting down completely, and despite federal and state spending, some businesses will not be able to come back from their current deficit. Following Bradley’s statement, Dr. Ayman El Tarabishy of the International Council for Small Business describes our collective movement towards a new normality. He comments on our current situation by enlightening the audience to the hurt of small businesses. Enterprises, housing only four to five employees, are those that often survive financially on a month-to-month basis. Additionally, El Tarabishy comments on how even large businesses who have invested in the upcoming spring season will feel this crisis. Throughout this moment, the unknown of time is the most important variable. Dr. El Tarabishy indicates that companies would have an easier time adjusting to this moment of loss, if they were able to define an end date and work backwards in adjusting their income structure. However, definitive time is not a luxury for which our current crisis allows. As about two trillion dollars are coming from the government, most businesses, who without aid would be severely suffering, are feeling grateful to stay open and be able to pay their employees properly. However, what will happen when it is time to pay the April paychecks? This conversation must also include a monetary percentage, therefore if businesses are able to pay their employees with the help of the government this month, they will have to replay this scene again next month. Luckily, according to Dr. El Tarabishy, small businesses are known to try to first take care of their employees. 

The presenter then asks Dr. El Tarabishy if this shut down is too large a price to pay for the pandemic, to which El Tarabishy immediately responds “no.” He states that small businesses are based in humane entrepreneurship, and while there are those who will see this virus in a negative light, there are others that will note how their enterprise’s sacrifice was made for humanity. It is this change in the narrative that will shift the way that the next generations view this moment in history. Small businesses are resilient, and that resilience shines brightest in moments of crisis, like that of today. That spirit will hopefully work concurrently with a long term plan set forth by the government. As it seems impossible to predict the future, especially as we find ourselves in such a volatile state, only the evolution of time will determine if large spending during this period will be worth it. Dr. El Tarabishy notes that if people are willing to sacrifice in the short term for their long term survival, they often need to know how long that short term period will last. This uncertainty leaves us individuals with a choice. One in which we can choose to wait for the worst or another in which we can show our true resilient humanity. (Listen to the report here)

Reference broadcast: 25% of US small businesses could close 

-BBC World Report

Salute to Health Care Providers

Salute to Health Care Providers

A Salute to Health Care Providers 

Friday, April 3, 2020

A Salute to Health Care Providers

Friday, April 3, 2020

Dear Health Care Providers,

Thank you.

Of all the words I could think of to start this letter to you, those had to be the first. Yet those words seem so pale and ordinary, weak words to express appreciation for strong deeds. Like many of the pioneering doctors, nurses, medical assistants, and others in the healthcare field before you, you have a long history of striving to dramatically improve the care of sick patients. It’s not different today; it’s no different in your case.

We know that your job goes beyond a single duty. You not only continuously care for those of us who are sick, injured, disabled, or dying, but you take on the responsibility of encouraging good health among families and communities, even when people close their ears to your sound advice. We know you are also busily involved in health care research, management, policy deliberations, and patient advocacy. It’s a full plate. Yet you’re not done there. Along with your job, you also juggle family life and higher education schooling. It’s truly impressive and not for the weak-willed.

But now the crisis has struck, and you are being asked to add even more to your plate. You are our first defense and our frontline–the place only the bravest dared to fight–in the battle against COVID-19. You are asked to go up against an unseen enemy, even asked to do so without adequate protection and amidst dwindling supplies. You’ve already made so many sacrifices, and yet you are being asked to make more, even at risk to your health, at the risk of losing sleep and rest, at the cost of being with your families.

As a Deputy Chair of the Department of Management at The George Washington School of Business and Executive Director of ICSB, I have always stressed the importance of cultivating empathy and humanity—a human touch when it comes to dealing with others—but you already had it. It’s why you are a healthcare provider in the first place. It’s your vocation and your passion. You carry that empathy and humanity through your exhaustion, under often difficult circumstances, and somehow find the emotional strength to comfort the sick, the dying, and their loved ones. How can anyone call all this less than heroic?

So, to all the brave health care providers—women and men—the moms, the dads, the sons, the daughters, the heroes, the fighters, the leaders, for your sacrifices. We can only end this letter with the sincerest and most grateful, thank you!

We ask all the ICSB and GW Family to do a Local Salute to all on the front lines of the coronavirus fight every evening by applauding them from your balconies or patios.

 Please check what time it is conducted in your Neighborhood. If not, please start it!

Article written by:

Dr. Ayman El Tarabishy
ICSB Executive Director
Deputy Chair of Department of Management at George Washington University School of Business

JICSB Special Issue: Sustainable Entrepreneurship

JICSB Special Issue: Sustainable Entrepreneurship

General Overview

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, adopted by the United Nations in 2015, addresses the most pressing challenges of our time, such as climate change and COVID-19, social injustice, human rights, and economic growth. Incorporating the sustainable development goals (SDGs) into society’s fabric is essential for just and equitable sustainable development for all. The SDGs purpose is to stimulate everyone, from governments, businesses, NGOs, citizens, and other stakeholders, to accelerate actions that benefit the people and the planet, by fostering actions and partnerships at all levels, so no one is left behind. And since MSMEs are the foundation of our economies and society, they are at the critical leading edge of the UN’s sustainable development initiative.

Sustainable entrepreneurs are our best hope to achieve the SDGs, working within a network of like-minded visionaries, innovators, and troubleshooters. This Special Issue of the Journal of the International Council for Small Business (JICSB) aims to document cases of sustainable entrepreneurship across the world and to accelerate knowledge about what works and could be amplified.

Guest Editors

Prof. Analia Pastran
Exec Director of Smartly, Social Entrepreneurship on SDGs
Ph. D. Chantal Line Carpentier
Chief of UNCTAD New York
Ph. D. Adnane Maalaoui
Managing Director IPAG Entrepreneurship Center

Deadline

Call Opens                                  May 2020
Call Ends                                    October 2020 
Publication date                         January 2021 

More Info:

Prof. Analia Pastran:  apastran@insmartly.com
Ph. D. Adnane Maalaoui: a.maalaoui@ipag.fr 

Paper Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at JICSB Sustainable Entrepreneurship, click here to go to the submission form. Papers can be submitted until the deadline, 1 October 2020 by midnight. They should be limited to 10 pages per article, answer the so-what question, indicate how it ties to the SDGs, and how we can leverage more research.

All papers will be approved by the Special Editors, Prof. Analia Pastran, Dr. Chantal Line Carpentier and Dr. Adnane Maalaoui. Accepted papers will be published in the JICSB’s special issue (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website.
Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except as conference proceedings papers).

Please have in mind the following steps to submit your paper:

1. JICSB Guidelines for authors can be found at https://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?show=instructions&journalCode=ucsb20.

2. Submit a Paper Proposal to JICSB Sustainable Entrepreneurship (click here).

3. There is a dedicated track titled “Sustainable Entrepreneurship” in which you can associate your paper.

4. We will review the paper and we will recognize some articles in the ICSB World Congress 2021.

5. All the Editors of the Special Issue (Prof. Analia Pastran,  Dr. Chantal Line Carpentier, Dr. Adnane Malaui) will be at the ICSB 2021 Congress to give the recognition awards to the authors. 

Keyword and topics:

  • MSME policy supporting the UN SDGs
  • Sustainable Entrepreneurship
  • Sustainability
  • Sustainable Development Goals
  • Contributions from private sector to achieve the Sustainable Development
  • Humane entrepreneurship and SDGs
  • Social Entrepreneurship and SDGs
  • MSMEs and SDGs
  • Economic development initiatives supporting SDGs
  • NGO or government policy supporting SDGs
  • Inclusive entrepreneurship
  • Disadvantage entrepreneurship
 
 
On Reporting and Interpreting Statistical Significance and P Values in Medical Research

On Reporting and Interpreting Statistical Significance and P Values in Medical Research

By: Herman Aguinis, Matt Vassar, Cole Wayant

Originally published online: November 15, 2019

INTRODUCTION

Recent proposals to change the p value threshold from 0.05 to 0.005 or to retire statistical significance altogether have garnered much criticism and debate. As of the writing of our manuscript, the proposal to eliminate statistical significance testing, backed by over 800 signatories, achieved record-breaking status on Altmetrics, with an attention score exceeding 13000 derived from 19000 Twitter comments and 35 news stories. We appreciate the renewed enthusiasm for tackling important issues related to the analysis, reporting and interpretation of scientific research results. Our perspective, however, focuses on the current use and reporting of statistical significance and where we should go from here.

CLICK HERE TO READ FULL ARTICLE >

Click here to read all Journal of Small Business Management articles > 

 
Actionable Recommendations for Narrowing the Science-Practice Gap in Open Science

Actionable Recommendations for Narrowing the Science-Practice Gap in Open Science

By: Herman Aguinis, George C. Banks, Steven G. Rogelberg, Wayne F. Cascio

Originally published online: March 3, 2020

ABSTRACT

Efforts to promote open-science practices are, to a large extent, driven by a need to reduce questionable research practices (QRPs). There is ample evidence that QRPs are corrosive because they make research opaque and therefore challenge the credibility, trustworthiness, and usefulness of the scientific knowledge that is produced. A literature based on false-positive results that will not replicate is not only scientifically misleading but also worthless for anyone who wants to put knowledge to use. So, a question then arises: Why are these QRPs still so pervasive and why do gatekeepers of scientific knowledge such as journal editors, reviewers, funding- agency panel members, and board members of professional organizations in charge of journal policies not seem to be taking decisive actions about QRPs? We address these questions by using a science-practice gap analogy to identify the existence of a science-practice gap in open science. Specifically, although there is abundant research on how to reduce QRPs, many gatekeepers are not adopting this knowledge in their practices. Drawing upon the literatures on the more general science- practice gap and QRPs, we offer 10 actionable recommendations for narrowing the specific science-practice gap in open science. Our recommendations require little effort, time, and financial resources. Importantly, they are explicit about the resulting benefits for the various research-production stakeholders (i.e., authors and gatekeepers). By translating findings on open-science research into actionable recommendations for “practitioners of research”, we hope to encourage more transparent, credible, and reproducible research that can be trusted and used by consumers of that research.

CLICK HERE TO READ FULL ARTICLE >

Click here to read all Journal of Small Business Management articles >